The Resistance in Photos: Trump’s First 100 Days

Lauryn Gutierrez

As a photojournalist, I have toted my camera to at least 27 marches and actions since Inauguration Day—many of them organized by “ordinary” citizens who felt called to demonstrate for their rights, the well-being of their children, the safety of their neighbors, and the humanity of strangers. The ability to elevate the voices, faces, and stories that are so often discounted by the mainstream media has fueled my return to the streets week after week.

It’s important to note that the peaceful displays of anger don’t begin or end at rallies for activists. There are scores of actions in Washington, D.C., and across the country that are documented only in the hearts and minds of those present. That fact speaks to how activists showing up doesn’t begin or end with waving a sign at publicized rallies and marches. Communities marginalized by U.S. policy and practice continue to need support and real, consequential action from allies to survive.

At its core, this work is about respect and recognition, particularly regarding those on the opposite side of the lens who see human rights as non-negotiable. And the work undoubtedly will continue as long as this administration’s attacks against vulnerable communities continue.