Elizabeth Miller MD PhD and Jay Silverman PhD

Dr. Liz Miller is Assistant Professor in Pediatrics at the U.C. Davis Children’s Hospital. She is a nationally and internationally recognized expert in teen dating abuse and gender-based violence. Trained in medical anthropology as well as Internal Medicine and Pediatrics, Dr. Miller’s research has included examination of risk for HIV and sex trafficking among women in Japan. She has participated on a United Nations Expert Workgroup to craft guidelines for health care providers on the care of trafficked persons. In addition, she has conducted research on the impact of teen dating abuse on adolescent health, in particular the relationship between dating abuse and teen pregnancy. She has a particular passion for working with marginalized youth populations, including pregnant-parenting teens, gang-involved youth, youth in foster care, and homeless youth.

Jay G. Silverman, Ph.D., is an Associate Professor of Society, Human Development and Health and Director of Violence Against Women Prevention Research at the Harvard School of Public Health. The sole focus of his research and practice is the study and prevention of gender-based violence against adolescent and adult women both in the U.S. and internationally. Dr. Silverman has published over 80 peer-reviewed manuscripts on the topics of intimate partner violence, sexual assault, and sex trafficking, and the effects of these forms of violence on the health of women and their children. Dr. Silverman is also co-author of a practitioner guidebook entitled The Batterer as Parent (Sage, 2002), for which he and co-author Lundy Bancroft were awarded the 2004 Pro Humanitate Literary Award for Most Outstanding Contribution to Child Welfare Practice by the North American Resource Center for Child Welfare.


All Work

Partner Violence and Unintended Pregnancy: Time to Make the Connections

Elizabeth Miller MD PhD and Jay Silverman PhD

Violence and abuse are more closely associated with unintended pregnancy than with pregnancies that are intended. Forced sex, fear of violence if she refuses sex, and difficulties negotiating contraception and condom use in the context of an abusive relationship all contribute to increased risk for unintended pregnancy as well as for sexually transmitted infections including HIV. Newer research now also points to the influences of male control of contraception and pregnancy pressure on unintended pregnancy.

Rewire

All the latest news, analysis and commentary delivered to you.

Subscribe

Rewire

All the latest news, analysis and commentary delivered to you.

Subscribe