News Abortion

Complaint Filed Against Mayor of Buenos Aires for Giving Anti-Choice Group Private Information About Rape Victim’s Abortion

Robin Marty

A complaint over violating a woman's medical privacy could oust the mayor from his office.  

Yesterday, we found out that a judge in Buenos Aires, Argentina, acting in response to a petition filed by an anti-choice group, stopped doctors from performing a legal abortion on a woman who became pregnant as a result of rape.

Today, we learn how the anti-choice group got the woman’s private information regarding both the abortion and the location where it would be performed. From the city’s mayor.

Via Fox News:

Opposition politicians on Wednesday filed a criminal complaint against Buenos Aires Mayor Mauricio Macri for alerting a pro-life group that a rape victim was going to undergo an abortion at a municipal hospital in the capital.

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“Macri divulged information that should have been private and confidential, and that made it possible for Judge (Myrian) Rustan de Estrada to grant the motion presented by the NGO Pro-Vida, which caused the suspension of the abortion,” complainant Emelia Alonso told a press conference.

Macri’s actions could result in a fine, as well as up to three years out of public office, according to the report.

News Abortion

Abortion Legal for Rape Survivors in Argentina Except When the Courts Step In

Robin Marty

A woman who wanted to terminate her pregnancy has had her abortion halted by the courts at the request of an anti-choice group.

Imagine a country where abortion is legal if you become pregnant as a result of rape, but strangers could step in and force you to give birth. This might happen to a woman in Argentina whose abortion has been put on hold at the request of an anti-choice group—with the court’s approval.

Via Fox News:

A court order that barred a rape victim Tuesday from having an abortion has sparked a heated controversy in Argentina.

The embattled judicial ruling came in response to a motion by the Pro-Vida (Pro-Life) group to stop the interruption of a 32-year-old woman’s pregnancy.

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The operation was to be the first non-punishable abortion performed in a public hospital following the legal reform passed by the Buenos Aires municipal legislature.

Judge Myrian Rustan ordered the suspension of the abortion and said that health authorities should provide “physical and psychiatric assistance to the patient,” Pro-Vida attorney Pedro Andereggen told official news agency Telam.

The decision contradicts an Argentine Supreme Court ruling in March that decriminalizes abortion in case of rape.

Pro-Vida apparently learned the identity of the hospital where the abortion was to be performed and stepped in to “defend the rights of the unborn.” According to an article in Koas in la Red (google translated), the group said that “the unborn child is a person” and that “the child should not be punished.” Its lawyer, Andereggen Pedro, claimed that abortion would not “alleviate the trauma” of the woman and would potentially make it worse once she understood she was “murdering” her child.

The release of medical information, such as where the procedure would be performed, was a violation of this woman’s right to privacy. That’s disturbing enough, but it’s also disturbing that justifications for attempting to force rape survivors to give birth are seemingly the same, regardless of the country.