Roundup: Huge Unmet Need for Contraception in Uganda, Highest in Africa

Jodi Jacobson

Uganda experiences the highest unmet need for contraception in sub-Saharan Africa; a judge dismisses Christian adoption agency challenge of stem-cell research process; ACLU responds to criticism of Kentucky Courier-Journal editorial

Huge Unmet Need for Contraception in Uganda

Uganda has the highest rate of unmet need for contraception in Africa, reports the Guardian UK, denying women the ability to avoid unintended pregnancy and to choose the number and timing of children they bear.

"Limited access to family planning services, fears about side
effects, opposition from partners and religious beliefs have led to
Uganda having the highest unmet need for contraception in east Africa," says the Guardian. Research indicates that this unmet need for family planning is
highest among illiterate women such as the HIV-positive mother of seven children who would like to avoid getting pregnant again.

According to Dr Moses Muwonge, the national reproductive health

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commodity security coordinator at Uganda’s Ministry of Health, 41% of
women in Uganda have an unmet need for contraception. Rates in
neighbouring countries Kenya and Tanzania stand at 25% and 22%
respectively. Rwanda has a rate 38%, while Ethiopia’s is 34%.

Rates
keep increasing, but Muwonge says the ministry has not got enough
resources to tackle the problem. The government will need up to US$25m
to adequately meet the contraception needs of its population by 2015,
he added.

"Uganda’s contribution towards funding family planning
is negligible. It is less than 5%. Unless donors increase funding, it
might not be easy for the country to meet the unmet needs," Muwonge
warned at a health workshop for journalists in Kampala last month,
organised by the Uganda Health Communication Alliance (UHCA), with funding from the US-based Population Reference Bureau.

Judge Dismisses Challenge To Changes in Stem-Cell Research Guidelines

A judge on Tuesday dismissed a Christian adoption agency’s
challenge to Obama administration regulations expanding stem cell
research, reports the Associated Press.

The case arose from a decision by President Barack
Obama to lift restraints on stem-cell research that were put in place
by President George W. Bush.

Nightlight Christian Adoptions
contended in a lawsuit that the government’s new guidelines will
decrease the number of human embryos available for adoption. U.S.
District Judge Royce Lamberth called that assertion speculative.
Donors, the judge said, still may choose to continue to store the
embryos or give them to an adoption agency rather than donate them for
research.

ACLU Kentucky responds to criticism of Courier-Journal Editorial

Criticisms of an editorial that appeared October 18th, 2009 in the Kentucky Courier-Journal supporting the recommendations of the recently released Guttmacher Institute report on global abortion trends prompted a response in defense of the editorial from the Director of the American Civil Liberties Union Reproductive Freedom Project in Louisville.

The Guttmacher study examined data on abortion trends worldwide, including the high rate of abortion and deaths among women from unsafe abortion.  The original Courier-Journal editorial supported the Guttmacher recommendations of ensuring greater access to family planning services and contraceptive supplies to reduce unintended pregnancies, ensuring access to safe, legal abortion services, and ensuring access to post-abortion care.  These steps, taken simultaneously, would reduce unintended pregnancies and hence the need for abortion, while also reducing deaths and illness among women from unsafe abortion.

Responding to criticisms of the Courier-Journal’s endorsement of these recommendations, Derek Selznick of the Louisville ACLU wrote:

[R]egardless of where we land on the political
spectrum, each of us has strong feelings about abortion. One thing we
can all agree on is that when 70,000 women die and 8 million women
suffer medical complications from unsafe abortions, something is wrong
The C-J agreed that the Guttmacher Institute’s three recommendations are common sense solutions to this problem.
All
three of these recommendations make sense and focus on what we should
do, which is make abortion less necessary, not more dangerous and
difficult. Now that is something we all should agree on. 

 

October 28th, 2009

Huge unmet need for contraceptives in Uganda Guardian

Judge dismisses lawsuit challenging stem cell rule The Associated Press

Tiny town’s big voice for adoptions Cincinnati.com
City proposal targets pregnancy clinics that lack abortion services Baltimore Sun
Texas’ Catholic bishops want additional provisions in healthcare bill Fort Worth Star Telegram
Colombian high court rules Catholic hospitals must provide abortions Catholic Cultur

October 27th, 2009
Abortion: less necessary, less dangerous Louisville Courier-Journal

Michigan Democrat Leads Effort to Strip Abortion Exemption From Health Care Bill FOXNews

Winnipeg pro-choice and pro-life supporters demonstrate side by side Manitoban
Rally for Choice at Oklahoma State Capitol Feminists for Choice
Loyola Students for Life respond Loyola Phoenix
Unmarried and Uninsured Center For American Progress

Crunch Time on Health Care America Magazine

Climate change is a feminist issue Guardian
Anglican Priests and Contraception National Catholic Reporter
Abstinence-only education not right for Wisconsin schools Examiner.com
Corzine Left Vacuum In Family-Life Data Cape May County Herald
What Will ebay Do? Anti-Abortion Auction Slated CBS News

Abortion foes’ sick plan in Kansas murder case Midwest Voices
The Obama Abortion Games Canada Free Press
Catholic officials protest court ruling to teach about abortion rights The Pilot
Nun Is an Abortion Escort National Catholic Register
Law and Order’s Shameful Abortion Episode Feminist Law Professors
Abortion foe urges ‘Burn in Hell’ protest The Associated Press
Accused shooter of abortion foe found competent The Associated Press
Man who beat teen to cause abortion gets up to 5 years in prison Salt Lake Tribune
Michigan Anti-abortion Personhood Initiative Introduced Ms. Magazine

Anti-abortion Democrat Bart Stupak has a problem with Obama’s health reforms Los Angeles Times
Abortion opponents sue Milwaukee, police over treatment at protests Milwaukee Journal Sentinel

Killing Tiller was far from a noble act Kansas City Star
What if the Kennedy Legacy Had Been Pro-Life? Southern Appeal

Is obamacare Pro-Life? Wall Street Journal

Teen Parents a More Diverse Group Than Most Believe Reuters
Pregnant covergirl of Teen Vogue raises eyebrows The Associated Press


 

 

 

 

 

Roundups Politics

Campaign Week in Review: ‘If You Don’t Vote … You Are Trifling’

Ally Boguhn

The chair of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) this week blasted those who sit out on Election Day, and mothers who lost children to gun violence were given a platform at the party's convention.

The chair of the Democratic National Convention (DNC) this week blasted those who sit out on Election Day, and mothers who lost children to gun violence were given a platform at the party’s convention.

DNC Chair Marcia Fudge: “If You Don’t Vote, You Are Ungrateful, You Are Lazy, and You Are Trifling”

The chair of the 2016 Democratic National Convention, Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-OH), criticized those who choose to sit out the election while speaking on the final day of the convention.

“If you want a decent education for your children, you had better vote,” Fudge told the party’s women’s caucus, which had convened to discuss what is at stake for women and reproductive health and rights this election season.

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“If you want to make sure that hungry children are fed, you had better vote,” said Fudge. “If you want to be sure that all the women who survive solely on Social Security will not go into poverty immediately, you had better vote.”

“And if you don’t vote, let me tell you something, there is no excuse for you. If you don’t vote, you don’t count,” she said.

“So as I leave, I’m just going to say this to you. You tell them I said it, and I’m not hesitant about it. If you don’t vote, you are ungrateful, you are lazy, and you are trifling.”

The congresswoman’s website notes that she represents a state where some legislators have “attempted to suppress voting by certain populations” by pushing voting restrictions that “hit vulnerable communities the hardest.”

Ohio has recently made headlines for enacting changes that would make it harder to vote, including rolling back the state’s early voting period and purging its voter rolls of those who have not voted for six years.

Fudge, however, has worked to expand access to voting by co-sponsoring the federal Voting Rights Amendment Act, which would restore the protections of the Voting Rights Act that were stripped by the Supreme Court in Shelby County v. Holder.

“Mothers of the Movement” Take the National Spotlight

In July 2015, the Waller County Sheriff’s Office released a statement that 28-year-old Sandra Bland had been found dead in her jail cell that morning due to “what appears to be self-asphyxiation.” Though police attempted to paint the death a suicide, Bland’s family has denied that she would have ended her own life given that she had just secured a new job and had not displayed any suicidal tendencies.

Bland’s death sparked national outcry from activists who demanded an investigation, and inspired the hashtag #SayHerName to draw attention to the deaths of Black women who died at the hands of police.

Tuesday night at the DNC, Bland’s mother, Geneva Reed-Veal, and a group of other Black women who have lost children to gun violence, in police custody, or at the hands of police—the “Mothers of the Movement”—told the country why the deaths of their children should matter to voters. They offered their support to Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton during a speech at the convention.

“One year ago yesterday, I lived the worst nightmare anyone could imagine. I watched as my daughter was lowered into the ground in a coffin,” said Geneva Reed-Veal.

“Six other women have died in custody that same month: Kindra Chapman, Alexis McGovern, Sarah Lee Circle Bear, Raynette Turner, Ralkina Jones, and Joyce Curnell. So many of our children are gone, but they are not forgotten,” she continued. 

“You don’t stop being a mom when your child dies,” said Lucia McBath, the mother of Jordan Davis. “His life ended the day that he was shot and killed for playing loud music. But my job as his mother didn’t.” 

McBath said that though she had lost her son, she continued to work to protect his legacy. “We’re going to keep telling our children’s stories and we’re urging you to say their names,” she said. “And we’re also going to keep using our voices and our votes to support leaders, like Hillary Clinton, who will help us protect one another so that this club of heartbroken mothers stops growing.” 

Sybrina Fulton, the mother of Trayvon Martin, called herself “an unwilling participant in this movement,” noting that she “would not have signed up for this, [nor would] any other mother that’s standing here with me today.” 

“But I am here today for my son, Trayvon Martin, who is in heaven, and … his brother, Jahvaris Fulton, who is still here on Earth,” Fulton said. “I did not want this spotlight. But I will do everything I can to focus some of this light on the pain of a path out of the darkness.”

What Else We’re Reading

Renee Bracey Sherman explained in Glamour why Democratic vice presidential nominee Tim Kaine’s position on abortion scares her.

NARAL’s Ilyse Hogue told Cosmopolitan why she shared her abortion story on stage at the DNC.

Lilly Workneh, the Huffington Post’s Black Voices senior editor, explained how the DNC was “powered by a bevy of remarkable black women.”

Rebecca Traister wrote about how Clinton’s historic nomination puts the Democratic nominee “one step closer to making the impossible possible.”

Rewire attended a Democrats for Life of America event while in Philadelphia for the convention and fact-checked the group’s executive director.

A woman may have finally clinched the nomination for a major political party, but Judith Warner in Politico Magazine took on whether the “glass ceiling” has really been cracked for women in politics.

With Clinton’s nomination, “Dozens of other women across the country, in interviews at their offices or alongside their children, also said they felt on the cusp of a major, collective step forward,” reported Jodi Kantor for the New York Times.

According to Philly.com, Philadelphia’s Maternity Care Coalition staffed “eight curtained breast-feeding stalls on site [at the DNC], complete with comfy chairs, side tables, and electrical outlets.” Republicans reportedly offered similar accommodations at their convention the week before.

Roundups Politics

Campaign Week in Review: Republican National Convention Edition

Ally Boguhn

The Trump family's RNC claims about crime and the presidential candidate's record on gender equality have kept fact-checkers busy.

Republicans came together in Cleveland this week to nominate Donald Trump at the Republican National Convention (RNC), generating days of cringe-inducing falsehoods and misleading statements on crime, the nominee’s positions on gender equality, and LGBTQ people.

Trump’s Acceptance Speech Blasted for Making False Claims on Crime

Trump accepted the Republican nomination in a Thursday night speech at the RNC that drew harsh criticism for many of its misleading and outright false talking points.

Numerous fact-checkers took Trump to task, calling out many of his claims for being “wrong,” and “inflated or misleading.”

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 Among the most hotly contested of Trump’s claims was the assertion that crime has exploded across the country.

“Decades of progress made in bringing down crime are now being reversed by this administration’s rollback of criminal enforcement,” Trump claimed, according to his prepared remarks, which were leaked ahead of his address. “Homicides last year increased by 17 percent in America’s 50 largest cities. That’s the largest increase in 25 years. In our nation’s capital, killings have risen by 50 percent. They are up nearly 60 percent in nearby Baltimore.”

Crime rates overall have been steadily declining for years.

“In 2015, there was an uptick in homicides in 36 of the 50 largest cities compared to the previous years. The rate did, indeed, increase nearly 17 percent, and it was the worst annual change since 1990. The homicide rate was up 54.3 percent in Washington, and 58.5 percent in Baltimore,” explained Washington Post fact checkers Glenn Kessler and Michelle Ye Hee Lee. “But in the first months of 2016, homicide trends were about evenly split in the major cities. Out of 63 agencies reporting to the Major Cities Chiefs Association, 32 cities saw a decrease in homicides in first quarter 2016 and 31 saw an increase.”

Ames Grawert, a counsel in the Brennan Center’s Justice Program, said in a statement posted to the organization’s website that 2016 statistics aren’t sufficient in declaring crime rate trends. 

“Overall, crime rates remain at historic lows. Fear-inducing soundbites are counterproductive, and distract from nuanced, data-driven, and solution-oriented conversations on how to build a smarter criminal justice system in America,” Grawert said. “It’s true that some cities saw an increase in murder rates last year, and that can’t be ignored, but it’s too early to say if that’s part of a national trend.” 

When Paul Manafort, Trump’s campaign chairman, was confronted with the common Republican falsehoods on crime during a Thursday interview with CNN’s Jake Tapper, he claimed that the FBI’s statistics were not to be trusted given that the organization recently advised against charges in connection with Hillary Clinton’s use of a private email server during her tenure as secretary of state.

“According to FBI statistics, crime rates have been going down for decades,” Tapper told Manafort. “How can Republicans make the argument that it’s somehow more dangerous today when the facts don’t back that up?”

“People don’t feel safe in their neighborhoods,” said Manafort, going on to claim that “the FBI is certainly suspect these days after what they did with Hillary Clinton.”

There was at least one notable figure who wholeheartedly embraced Trump’s fearmongering: former KKK Grand Wizard David Duke. “Great Trump Speech,” tweeted Duke on Thursday evening. “Couldn’t have said it better!”

Ben Carson Claims Transgender People Are Proof of “How Absurd We Have Become”

Former Republican presidential candidate Ben Carson criticized the existence of transgender people while speaking at the Florida delegation breakfast on Tuesday in Cleveland.  

“You know, we look at this whole transgender thing, I’ve got to tell you: For thousands of years, mankind has known what a man is and what a woman is. And now, all of a sudden we don’t know anymore,” said Carson, a retired neurosurgeon. “Now, is that the height of absurdity? Because today you feel like a woman, even though everything about you genetically says that you’re a man or vice versa?”

“Wouldn’t that be the same as if you woke up tomorrow morning after seeing a movie about Afghanistan or reading some books and said, ‘You know what? I’m Afghanistan. Look, I know I don’t look that way. My ancestors came from Sweden, or something, I don’t know. But I really am. And if you say I’m not, you’re a racist,’” Carson said. “This is how absurd we have become.”

When confronted with his comments during an interview with Yahoo News’ Katie Couric, Carson doubled down on his claims.“There are biological markers that tell us whether we are a male or a female,” said Carson. “And just because you wake up one day and you say, ‘I think I’m the other one,’ that doesn’t change it. Just, a leopard can’t change its spots.”

“It’s not as if they woke up one day and decided, ‘I’m going to be a male or I’m going to be a female,’” Couric countered, pointing out that transgender people do not suddenly choose to change their gender identities on a whim.

Carson made several similar comments last year while on the campaign trail.

In December, Carson criticized the suggested that allowing transgender people into the military amounted to using the armed services “as a laboratory for social experimentation.”

Carson once suggested that allowing transgender people to use the restroom that aligned with their gender identity amounted to granting them “extra rights.”

Ivanka Trump Claims Her Father Supports Equal Pay, Access to Child Care

Ivanka Trump, the nominee’s daughter, made a pitch during her speech Thursday night at the RNC for why women voters should support her father.

“There have always been men of all background and ethnicities on my father’s job sites. And long before it was commonplace, you also saw women,” Ivanka Trump said. “At my father’s company, there are more female than male executives. Women are paid equally for the work that we do and when a woman becomes a mother, she is supported, not shut out.” 

“As president, my father will change the labor laws that were put into place at a time when women were not a significant portion of the workforce. And he will focus on making quality child care affordable and accessible for all,” she continued before pivoting to address the gender wage gap. 

“Policies that allow women with children to thrive should not be novelties; they should be the norm. Politicians talk about wage equality, but my father has made it a practice at his company throughout his entire career.”

However, Trump’s stated positions on the gender wage gap, pregnancy and mothers in the workplace, and child care don’t quite add up to the picture the Trumps tried to paint at the RNC.

In 2004, Trump called pregnancy an “inconvenience” for employers. When a lawyer asked for a break during a deposition in 2011 to pump breast milk, Trump reportedly called her “disgusting.”

According to a June analysis conducted by the Boston Globe, the Trump campaign found that men who worked on Trump’s campaign “made nearly $6,100, or about 35 percent more [than women during the April payroll]. The disparity is slightly greater than the gender pay gap nationally.”

A former organizer for Trump also filed a discrimination complaint in January, alleging that she was paid less than her male counterparts.

When Trump was questioned about equal pay during a campaign stop last October, he did not outline his support for policies to address the issue. Instead, Trump suggested that, “You’re gonna make the same if you do as good a job.” Though he had previously stated that men and women who do the same job should be paid the same during an August 2015 interview on MSNBC, he also cautioned that determining whether people were doing the same jobs was “tricky.”

Trump has been all but completely silent on child care so far on the campaign trail. In contrast, Clinton released an agenda in May to address the soaring costs of child care in the United States.

Ivanka’s claims were not the only attempt that night by Trump’s inner circle to explain why women voters should turn to the Republican ticket. During an interview with MSNBC’s Chris Matthews, Manafort said that women would vote for the Republican nominee because they “can’t afford their lives anymore.”

“Many women in this country feel they can’t afford their lives, their husbands can’t afford to be paying for the family bills,” claimed Manafort. “Hillary Clinton is guilty of being part of the establishment that created that problem. They’re going to hear the message. And as they hear the message, that’s how we are going to appeal to them.”

What Else We’re Reading

Vox’s Dara Lind explained how “Trump’s RNC speech turned his white supporters’ fear into a weapon.”

Now that Mike Pence is the Republican nominee for vice president, Indiana Republicans have faced “an intense, chaotic, awkward week of brazen lobbying at the breakfast buffet, in the hallways and on the elevators” at the convention as they grapple with who will run to replace the state’s governor, according to the New York Times.

“This is a party and a power structure that feels threatened with extinction, willing to do anything for survival,” wrote Rebecca Traister on Trump and the RNC for New York Magazine. “They may not love Trump, but he is leading them precisely because he embodies their grotesque dreams of the restoration of white, patriarchal power.”

Though Trump spent much of the primary season denouncing big money in politics, while at the RNC, he courted billionaires in hopes of having them donate to supporting super PACs.

Michael Kranish reported for the Washington Post that of the 2,472 delegates at the RNC, it is estimated that only 18 were Black.

Cosmopolitan highlighted nine of the most sexist things that could be found at the convention.

Rep. Steve King (R-IA) asked, “Where are these contributions that have been made” by people of color to civilization?