G20 Coverage: Funeral Procession for HIV and AIDS Funding?

Max October

People living with, being treated for or at risk of getting HIV and AIDS in the global south are being victimized again - by the current economic situation that is severely affecting funding for both prevention and treatment, says AIDS activists.

Max October will be covering the G20 for Rewire.

Starting at 1:30 today, Rewire is kindly hosting
live blogging and twittering
of a funeral procession held by AIDS activists at the G20 conference in
Pittsburgh today at 2pm. The funeral procession will be a visual reminder of
the toll of the G20 nations’ decisions (or lack of decisions) about the economy
and global health.

But the real story here is not about the funeral procession.
The real story is the stories of the people with HIV and AIDS or at
risk for HIV and AIDS in the global south, in countries like South
Africa, Rwanda, Malawi, and others. Over the past decades, through
efforts of AIDS activists working locally and internationally, people
in poor countries were starting to see improvement: things like more
access to treatment, lowered cost of HIV drugs, and increased life
expectancies.

But when the global recession hit, the donor nations went
back on their promises. Instead of expanding successful programs
that have saved millions of lives, countries are scaling back and not
paying the money they had pledged. The direct result of this scaling
back is clinics not taking new patients, as is happening right now
in South Africa. It is the government of Uganda ending their program
of providing free retroviral drugs to poor citizens. It is
medicine stock- outs in Malawi, where the country cannot afford to stock the treatments its citizens need, so that even if an individual
could afford medicine, it is simply not available.

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And those are just stories about treatment. One reality of
HIV/AIDS is that once a person starts treatment, they cannot stop
treatment. Stopping treatment has devastating consequences for the
course of the disease, and restarting it does not work. So when funding is
short and,programs need to be cut, prevention programs are cut first,
despite the fact that prevention is as important as treatment in
ending the epidemic. This is why it is incredibly important that the
rich nations at the G20 conference commit to increasing funding to fight
global AIDS, not decrease funding.

One particularly important commitment the G20 nations need
to honor is their commitment to the Global Fund for AIDS, TB, and
Malaria. The Global Fund is funded by rich nations and solicits grants
from poorer countries affected by the AIDS epidemic. This multilateral
funding allows programs like condom distribution and family planning
that can’t be funded by the US, under current law. In order to
continue to provide women and men at risk of contracting HIV with access
to the tools to protect their own reproductive health, the G20
nations must increase their commitment to the Global Fund. All treatment
programs should be kept open and expanded, and preventions efforts
must be kept open and accessible as well.

This is why we are processing, blogging, and tweeting today.
Continue to follow us on twitter and here throughout the afternoon,
as we bring the messages of speakers from groups such as New Voices
Pittsburgh: Women of Color for Reproductive Justice, the Metropolitan
Community Church, and Azania Heritage International.

Analysis Politics

Koch Brothers Move to Influence Congressional and State Races

Ally Boguhn

The Kochs are poised to play a momentous role in financing hundreds of candidates across the country and launching attacks on those who oppose their goals. Given their network’s penchant for funding anti-choice politicians and causes, that's something that should deeply concern reproductive rights advocates.

Over the weekend, Charles and David Koch’s network of ultra-wealthy donors and the politicians they fund convened in Colorado Springs, Colorado, to strategize about how to push their message across the countrya meeting that should signal cause for alarm for those concerned with big money in politics.

At the event, Charles Koch, joined by at least 300 donors who had each committed at least $100,000 annually to the network, reportedly outlined plans to get those with similar political ideologies elected to office and to “cultivat[e] conservative leaders at the state level,” according to the Washington Post.

During the 2012 election cycle, the Kochs’ network raised an estimated $407 million to influence races. As the Post‘s Matea Gold noted in a 2014 report, that level of funding gave the Kochs and their supporters expansive and almost unparalleled room to try to exert political influence.

As Adele Stan reported for Rewire in 2013, such influence extended in part to anti-choice groups, who received millions from Koch-connected organizations during the 2010 midterm and 2012 presidential election cycles. In addition, Koch-linked organizations gave tens of millions of dollars to candidates who were almost entirely opposed to abortion rights.

“The resources and the breadth of the organization make it singular in American politics: an operation conducted outside the campaign finance system, employing an array of groups aimed at stopping what its financiers view as government overreach,” explained Gold in another article. “Members of the coalition target different constituencies but together have mounted attacks on the new health-care law, federal spending and environmental regulations.”

In 2015 the Kochs revealed during their annual winter donor retreat that their network planned to spend up to $900 million on the 2016 election cycle, according to the New York Times—a number so high that it “would put [the network] on track to spend nearly as much as the campaigns of each party’s presidential nominee.” Conservative news outlet National Review, however, reported in May that the billionaires had intended to scale back the scope of their electoral funding, instead “steering their money and focus away from elections and toward a slew of the more intellectual, policy-oriented projects on which they have historically lavished their fortune.”

Still, the Kochs are poised to play a momentous role in financing hundreds of candidates across the country and launching attacks on those who oppose their goals. The extent of their contributions is carefully concealed by the web through which they funnel money—consisting of political action committees, issue-advocacy groups, nonprofit organizations, and the like—but what has been reported thus far offers a small glimpse into their political influence.

Though the allocated total spending was downgraded, the Koch network is nevertheless on track to spend almost $750 million this election cycle, with about $250 million going to politics and the Koch groups that work on policy issues, including Americans for Prosperity and the Freedom Partners Action Fund.

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“The [Koch] network is and will continue to be fully engaged in 2016’s political and policy battles. We want to maximize the number of freedom-oriented Senators,” James Davis, a spokesman for the Koch network, told the Hill in June amid news that the network was moving to spend $30 million on ad buys. “We see that on a number of issues, particularly free speech, the current majority is far preferable to the alternative.”

According to the Center for Responsive Politics’ OpenSecrets.org, which provides a comprehensive record of federal campaign contributions, the dark money group Americans for Prosperity—a 501(c)(4) that focuses on “citizen advocacy”—has spent at least $2,422,436 thus far on federal elections this cycle, investing in key Senate races in Nevada, Ohio, Pennsylvania, and Wisconsin.

Most of that money, more than $1.9 million, has been spent in Ohio to oppose the state’s former Democratic governor, Ted Strickland, in his race against incumbent Sen. Rob Portman (R). The two politicians have been locked in a tight battle for a critical seat that could help determine which party takes control of the Senate. The Koch-backed group launched a seven-figure ad buy last August focusing on Strickland’s tax policies as governor of Ohio.

Freedom Partners Action Fund, a super PAC founded by the Kochs in 2014 to which they have directly given $6 million so far this cycle, has invested even more into opposing Strickland, spending more than $9.4 million in independent expenditures, according to the Sunlight Foundation’s Influence Explorer. As was the case with Americans for Prosperity’s spending, much of that funding went directly to gigantic television and digital ad buys, again hitting Strickland’s tax policies.

In Wisconsin, Americans for Prosperity has spent $66,560 in opposition to Democratic Senate candidate Russ Feingold in his race against incumbent Republican Sen. Ron Johnson. Freedom Partners Action Fund’s spending in that same race, meanwhile, totals $2,102,645 in independent expenditures to oppose Feingold. The latter group also spent another $5,500 in support of Johnson.

However, just after Johnson spoke at the Republican National Convention in late July, Freedom Partners Action Fund pulled the $2.2 million worth of airtime they had reserved for the candidate. The ads were slated to begin airing on August 3.

James Davis, speaking on behalf of the organization, claimed the decision did not mean the group was no longer backing Johnson. “We are realigning our television advertising strategy to ensure maximum impact across key Senate races,” Davis told the Huffington Post. “We will continue direct citizen outreach through our grassroots activists, volunteer phone calls, digital media and direct mail. Last weekend alone Network grassroots organizations made almost half a million contact attempts to targeted audiences.”

Americans for Prosperity has thus far spent $63,233 in Pennsylvania’s key Senate race opposing Democratic candidate Katie McGinty, who is running against incumbent Sen. Pat Toomey (R), while Freedom Partners has spent $3,518,492 in independent expenditures doing the same.

And in Nevada, Americans for Prosperity has spent $16,074 opposing Democratic candidate Catherine Cortez Masto, who is running against Republican Rep. Joe Heck for the seat being vacated by Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D). Freedom Partners Action Fund has thus far spent $3,899,545 there opposing Cortez Masto. The group used much of that money pushing ads which were deemed by fact-checkers to be “mostly false,” alleging that as attorney general of the state, Cortez Masto had killed jobs by “driving” Uber out of Nevada. In truth, said Politifact, Uber only left temporarily and the ad “takes things out of context.”


Though the Kochs have seemingly failed to put much effort into House races thus far through Americans for Prosperity and the Freedom Partners Action Fund, there have been a few notable exceptions.

In early July, Americans for Prosperity geared up to launch a campaign aimed at aiding the re-election of Rep. Mike Coffman (R-CO), according to the Washington Post. The organization is reportedly not investing in paid media for the race, but it will be sending hundreds of staffers out to spread its message door to door. The Post reported that the 501(c)(4)’s goal in Colorado is to “help preserve the Republican majority by targeting districts where [Americans for Prosperity] already has staff and resources and can most efficiently affect voting outcomes, according to the group.” The group expects to spend six figures in the Colorado race.

Americans for Prosperity has already spent $62,384 thus far opposing the Democratic candidate for the House, state Sen. Morgan Carroll, in her race against Coffman.

The nonpartisan Rothenberg & Gonzales Political Report, which analyzes U.S. House, Senate, and gubernatorial campaigns, rates the Colorado 6th Congressional District as a toss-up, though it leans Republican.

Earlier in the year, Americans for Prosperity also spent $190,973 to defeat Rep. Renee Ellmers (R-NC) in her failed bid for re-election. Ellmers lost her primary race for North Carolina’s 2nd Congressional District in early June to her Republican colleague Rep. George Holding after redistricting in the state led the two to run against each other. Her defeat came amid targeting from anti-choice groups looking to unseat the representative despite her opposition to abortion, for reportedly speaking out against language in the House of Representatives’ 2015 20-week abortion ban that would have required rape victims to formally report their assault to police in order to be exempted from the law.

Koch Industries Inc. Political Action Committee (KOCHPAC), the political action committee for Koch companies, has invested almost all of its $1,209,900 in contributions to House Republican candidates. In total, the PAC has given $1,050,900 to 165 Republicans running for House seats and $8,500 to Democrats. The group has also given a total of $181,500 to 23 different Republicans running for the Senate, including Sen. Kelly Ayotte (NH), Sen. Marco Rubio (FL), Sen. Rand Paul (KY), Sen. Roy Blunt (MO), and Sen. Mike Lee (UT).

What was outlined above is probably just the tip of the iceberg. In addition to other Koch-connected groups not listed here, there are likely also other forms of spending by the groups discussed that has gone undisclosed.

Take, for example, some of the Kochs’ state-level work. As the Brennan Center for Justice explained in a recent report on money in politics, “it is at the state and local levels that secret spending is arguably at its most damaging,” and that is where the Kochs are now shifting some of their attention.

Though “dark money” 501(c)(4) groups, including Americans for Prosperity, are not required to disclose all of their spending, media reports indicate that the organization’s affiliates are investing in local races. According to the Brennan Center’s analysis of six states with available spending data, “on average, only 29 percent of outside spending was fully transparent in 2014 in the states we examined, sharply down from 76 percent in 2006.”  Yet, the report notes, “dark money surged in these states by 38 times on average between 2006 and 2014.”

Exact numbers may be elusive, but there is no doubt the Kochs will have major influence on the 2016 election cycle. According to Rewire‘s analysis, spending from just three of the key Koch groupsFreedom Partners Action Fund, Americans for Prosperity, and KOCHPAChas already occurred in congressional races in 43 states across the country. Given the network’s penchant for funding anti-choice politicians and causes, that’s something that should deeply concern reproductive rights advocates.

News Contraception

Funding Shortfall, Contraception Limits Mar GOP Zika Agreement

Christine Grimaldi

The Obama administration indicated that the latest House-passed Zika package is a non-starter for the president.

The $1.1 billion in Zika funding that Republicans railroaded through the U.S. House of Representatives around 3 a.m. Thursday underfunds the Obama administration’s request and limits access to contraceptive services, even though the disease can be sexually transmitted.

The largely party line 239-171 vote interrupted Democrats’ marathon, raucous sit-in demanding consideration of gun control proposals. House Speaker Paul Ryan (R-WI) called the House back into session shortly after 2:30 a.m. amid shouts of “No bill, no break!”

Rep. Jim McGovern (D-MA) attempted to request a final debate, otherwise known as a motion to recommit, on the conference report for Zika supplemental funding and fiscal year 2017 military construction and veterans affairs funding. The speaker pro tempore presiding over the House at the time instead spoke over McGovern and, in an unusual move, proceeded to a recorded vote without allowing debate on the measure, then adjourned the chamber early for its scheduled July 4 recess.

Congressional negotiators attempted to reconcile the differences between the House’s $622.1 million and the U.S. Senate’s $1.1 billion in Zika funding levels. Senate Appropriations Committee Vice Chair Barbara Mikulski (D-MD) in May called her chamber’s $1.1 billion “a bottom line, not a starting point for negotiations with the House.”

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Mikulski and other Democrats involved in the bicameral Zika negotiations ultimately refused to sign the final conference report (H. Rept. 114-640), slamming the Republican agreement for falling short of the $1.9 billion the Obama administration requested to combat Zika.

Democrats objected to the Zika package’s $750 million in offsets derived from leftover Ebola reserves, unspent Affordable Care Act funding for territories to establish health-care exchanges, and the U.S. Department of Health and Human Service’s administrative fund. “Offsetting emergency spending would set a precedent that will hinder our ability to respond to the next public health crisis, natural disaster, or national security event requiring emergency funding,” House Appropriations Committee Democrats, led by Rep. Nita Lowey (D-NY), said in a statement.

The latest stalemate comes as Zika infections are on the rise in the United States, according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) tracking. The CDC concluded that Zika causes microcephaly, an incurable neurological disorder that impairs brain and skull growth in utero, as well as other severe fetal brain defects.

Online requests for abortion medications have spiked in Latin American countries that issued warnings to pregnant people about Zika-related complications yet outlaw or restrict the procedure, according to a study published Wednesday in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Contraception Restrictions Anger Democrats

Democrats also decried language that they said would restrict access to contraceptive services for women in the United States and Puerto Rico.

Page 118 of the full conference report routes $95 million in Zika funds through the federal Social Services Block Grant program toward public health departments, hospitals, and Medicaid Managed Care clinics. This move “limits access to health care” in a sprawling territory with only 13 Medicaid Managed Care clinics, according to a Democratic summary obtained by Rewire.

“Of the 78 municipalities in Puerto Rico, only 12 include a Medicaid clinic. Twenty-six of the municipalities are not even adjacent to another municipality with a Medicaid clinic, and geographical conditions on the island (e.g., mountains) make travel between certain municipalities difficult,” the summary said. “For many women in Puerto Rico, this bill would make access to contraceptive services more difficult.”

The language also precludes awarding subgrants to outside groups “that could provide important services to hard-to-reach populations, especially hard-to-reach populations of women that want to access contraceptive services.”

Democrats alleged the Zika package takes similar restrictive actions on the international front.

“The Republican conference report does not explicitly prohibit funding for contraceptives or family planning activities in global health activities, but takes away the money, limits the use of funds, and forces USAID to rely on reprogramming which is a mechanism to slow the access to funds,” the summary said.

Specifically, Page 125 of the full conference report directs $145.5 million toward global health programs—nearly 60 percent below the administration’s request, according to the summary. The shortfall, along with a mandate to prioritize funds for mosquito control and vaccines, in effect leaves nothing for contraceptives or family planning programs to prevent sexual transmission of Zika.

Senate Minority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) called the Republican agreement “more of the same anti-woman” tactics, including repeated votes to defund Planned Parenthood.

“Instead of responding to this emergency that is threatening American women, Republicans are using this awful virus as an excuse for another attack on women’s health,” Reid said on the Senate floor Thursday morning.

Response Indicates Rocky Path Forward

The Obama administration indicated that the latest House-passed Zika package is a non-starter for the president.

“This plan from Congressional Republicans is four months late and nearly a billion dollars short of what our public health experts have said is necessary to do everything possible to fight the Zika virus and steals funding from other health priorities,” White House Spokesperson Josh Earnest said in a statement.

“The fact that the Republican plan limits needed birth control services for women in the United States and Puerto Rico as we seek to stop the spread of a sexually transmitted disease is a clear indication they don’t take seriously the threat from the Zika virus or their responsibility to protect Americans.”

A Senate Democratic aide told Rewire it’s “extremely unlikely this gets through the Senate.”

Although the motion to proceed on the conference report will be privileged and not subject to debate, Republicans still need 60 votes for cloture to end debate on the underlying measure itself, the aide said.

“By preventing the funding from going to Planned Parenthood, suspending environmental safety regs, underfunding veterans, and making cuts from public health programs, Republicans have decided to go their own way and hold Zika funding hostage to their own extreme agenda,” the aide said.

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