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Texas Bill Relating to the Regulation of Certain Facilitiles and Activities of Political Subdivisions (SB 3)

This law was last updated on Oct 31, 2017


This law is Anti–LGBTQ

State

Texas

Number

SB 3

Status

Failed to Pass

Proposed

Jul 20, 2017

Topics

Anti-Transgender, LGBTQ

Full Bill Text

www.legis.state.tx.us

SB 3 would regulate the use of public multi-occupancy restrooms, showers, and changing facilities based on the sex listed by a person’s birth certificate or other state-issued identification.

If passed, the bill would prohibit transgender individuals, especially children, from using the restroom facilities that conform with their gender identity.

Local Enforcement

The bill would prohibit a political subdivision, including a public school district, or an open-enrollment charter
school from adopting or enforcing an order, ordinance, policy, or other measure that:

  • relates to the designation or use of a multi-occupancy restroom, shower, or changing facility;
  • requires a private entity to adhere to any policy on the designation or use of such facilities;
  • allows a person whose birth certificate states their sex as male to participate in athletic activities designated for a person whose birth certificate states their sex as female.

A political subdivision, including a public school district or open-enrollment charter school, would be prohibiting from requiring a contractor to adopt, or prohibit the contractor from adopting, a policy on the designation or use of such bathroom facilities.

In awarding a contract for the purchase of goods and services, the bill would prohibit a political subdivision, including a public school district or open-enrollment charter school, from considering whether a private entity competing for the contract has adopted a policy regarding the designation or use of such facilities.

Related Legislation

Similar to HB 381.

Similar to SB 6, which failed to pass during the regular 2017 legislative session.

STATUS

Passed the senate on July 26, 2017, by a 19-12 vote.


People