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Minnesota Bill Regarding Financial Reporting Requirements of Abortions (HF 601)

This law was last updated on Sep 10, 2018


This law is Anti–Choice

State

Minnesota

Number

HF 601

Status

Failed to Pass

Proposed

Jan 30, 2017

Topics

Reporting Requirements, Targeted Regulation of Abortion Providers

Full Bill Text

wdoc.house.leg.state.mn.us

HF 601 would establish reporting requirements for abortion services, and modify payment procedures for such services.

The bill would grant the commissioner of human services with additional authority to sanction and terminate state health-care program providers. The commissioner would be able to revoke or deny enrollment of a provider that has a:

  • criminal conviction related to:
    • patient abuse or neglect;
    • health-care fraud; or
    • controlled substances; or
  • termination for cause under certain state laws.

Reporting Requirements

The bill would require vendors of medical care to document, for each abortion service provided to each patient, the portion of total vendor cost related to:

  • professional services related to performance of the abortion;
  • professional services for preprocedure and postprocedure visits related to the performance of the abortion; and
  • facility, administrative, and overhead costs related to performance of the abortion, reported separately for the services described in the above clauses.

Vendors would be required to submit the documentation to the commissioner, for each abortion service provided to each patient, in the manner specified by the commissioner.

Payment for Abortion Services

The bill would limit medical assistance payments for abortion services to only:

  • professional services related to performance of the abortion; and
  • professional services for preprocedure and postprocedure visits related to the performance of the abortion.

Medical assistance payment would not be provided for facility, administrative, and overhead costs related to performance of the abortion.

Grounds for Sanctions

The bill would allow the commissioner to impose sanctions against a vendor of medical care if they fail to meet “professionally recognized standards of care.”

Additionally, a commissioner may impose sanctions against a vendor for any of the following:

  • accepting a payment kickback or engaging in another activity prohibited under federal law;
  • submitting a claim for services furnished by a provider under sanction by federal or state government;
  • failure to supply payment and other information required or requested by the commissioner;
  • making a false statement or misrepresenting a material fact relating to the provision of services and billing for those services;
  • failure to ensure that services or items are provided economically and only when, and to the extent, medically necessary;
  • failure to ensure that a service or item is of a quality that meets professionally recognized standards of health care that are supported by evidence of necessity and quality;
  • being found liable for patient neglect that results in the death of, or injury to, the patient;
  • submittal of a claim for an abortion or related services when claim submittal would violate federal or state law;
  • failure to comply with the provider reporting requirements; and
  • failure to comply with a federal or state law requiring mandatory reporting of child sexual abuse, child sexual assault, child sex trafficking, or statutory rape.

People