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Massachusetts ‘Unborn Victims of Violence Act’ (H 935)

This law was last updated on Apr 17, 2019


This law is Anti–Choice

State

Massachusetts

Number

H 935

Status

Failed to Pass

Proposed

Jan 23, 2017

Sponsors

Co-sponsors: 5
Primary Sponsors: 1
Total Sponsors: 6

Topics

Fetal Homicide

Full Bill Text

malegislature.gov

H 935 would make it a criminal offense to cause bodily injury or death to an “unborn child.”

The bill defines unborn child to mean: “the individual human life in existence and developing from implantation of the embryo in the uterus until birth.”

The bill would create the following offenses in regard to the injury or death of an “unborn child”:

  • murder in the first degree;
  • murder in the second degree;
  • voluntary manslaughter;
  • involuntary manslaughter;
  • assault;
  • battery; and
  • assault and battery.

A person found guilty of murder in the first degree of an “unborn child” would be imprisoned for life without the possibility of parole. A person found guilty of murder in the second degree of an “unborn child” would be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for life and would be eligible for parole after the term of years fixed by the court.

A person found guilty of voluntary and involuntary manslaughter of an “unborn child” would be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 20 years or by a fine or not more than $1000 and imprisonment in jail or a house of correction for not more than 2½ years.

Assault upon an “unborn child” would be punishable by imprisonment for not more than 2½ years in a house of correction or by a fine of not more than $1000.

Battery of an “unborn child” resulting in bodily injury would be punishable by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 5 years or imprisonment in the house of correction for not more than 2½ years.

Whoever commits an assault and battery upon an “unborn child” and by such assault and battery causes substantial bodily injury would be punished by imprisonment in the state prison for not more than 15 years or imprisonment in the house of correction for not more than 2½ years or by a fine of not more than $15,000 or by both such fine and imprisonment.

This law would not apply to conduct relating to an abortion or medical procedure.

Related Legislation

Drafted by Massachusetts Citizens for Life, Inc., an affiliate of the National Right to Life Committee.

Similar to H 861.

Similar to H 1392 (2015) and H 1404 (2013), both of which failed to pass.


People

Organizations