News Abortion

Judge Denies Motion to Reconsider Oklahoma Forced Ultrasound Bill, But State Keeps Pushing

Robin Marty

The judge who ruled Oklahoma's forced ultrasound bill was unconstitutional has refused the state's attempt to appeal.

Oklahoma Judge Bryan Dixon has denied a motion to reconsider the ruling on the state’s forced ultrasound law, which was found unconstitutional earlier this year.

Via NECN.com:

District Judge Bryan Dixon rejected a motion filed by Attorney General Scott Pruitt’s office to reconsider his decision in an order filed in the court clerk’s office on Tuesday.

In March, Dixon invalidated a law requiring women seeking abortions to have an ultrasound image placed in front of them and listen to a detailed description of the fetus before the procedure.

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The Oklahoma Attorney General has already vowed to keep pursuing court challenges, despite the mounting costs of litigation, which at last count was over $145,000.

News Abortion

Alabama Co-Sponsor of Forced Ultrasound Bill Denies Selling Equipment to Abortion Clinics, But Providers Tell a Different Story

Robin Marty

A senator pushing for mandatory ultrasounds in Alabama claims his company wouldn't benefit financially.  But is he telling the truth?

Alabama State Senator Greg Reed says that his ultrasound company, Preferred Medical Systems, would in no way financially benefit if a mandatory ultrasound law passes in the state.  After all, he argues, his company doesn’t do business with abortion providers.

Tell that to the abortion provider he tried to sell equipment to a few months earlier.

Via The TimesDaily:

Reed, vice president of Preferred Medical Systems, told the TimesDaily he supports the bill because it would help “a mother to understand that a live baby is inside her body.”

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He also said the company, which sells ultrasound equipment, would not financially benefit if the bill became law. It is the company’s policy not to do business with abortion providers, Reed said.

But, Diane Derzis, who operates abortion clinics in Alabama, Georgia, Mississippi and Tennessee, said the company was willing to do business with her later last year.

“They’re lying, they’re absolutely lying,” Derzis said.

A copy of price quotes show that the Cordova, Tenn.-based company was offering Derzis several pieces of equipment used as demonstration models for between about $12,000 to $15,000.

Reed stood by his statement Friday, saying the company doesn’t always know immediately when it is an abortion clinic that’s seeking price information.

“Abortion clinics, we are not interested in doing business with them, but we do not know that when they call and ask for information,” Reed said.

When asked about the discrepancy, Reed explains that an employee was allegedly fired “for cause” around the same time as the quote occurred, suggesting that might be the reason he or she was let go.

Judge to Hear Oklahoma Ultrasound Law Today

Robin Marty

Today a judge will hear arguments for and against the currently blocked Oklahoma ultrasound law.

A district judge will begin to hear arguments today regarding a recent Oklahoma law requiring that all women must obtain an ultrasound prior to having an abortion, and must listen to detailed descriptions of the fetus.  The law, which was vetoed by the governor but overridden by the state legislature, has been blocked since the day it was enacted.

KOCO Oklahoma City reports:

Lawmakers passed the bill last March, but Gov. Brad Henry vetoed it and said it was unconstitutional.

In April, the Oklahoma Legislature overrode Henry’s decision, causing the Center for Reproductive Rights in New York to step in. The group said the Legislature was aggressively stripping away a woman’s privacy rights.

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“This signals the beginning of another costly and possibly futile legal battle for the state of Oklahoma,” Henry said after his veto was overridden.

In May, a judge temporarily blocked the law, leading to Monday’s hearing. There was no immediate word how long the temporary block will continue or when the judge might rule.

Defending the state will be Minnesota lawyer and 4th congressional district U.S. House candidate Teresa Collett.