Roundups Media

Global Roundup: Anti-Gay American Preacher Sued by Ugandan Activists

Jessica Mack

Weekly global roundup: abortion after rape now legal in Argentina; American preacher with ties to Uganda homophobia is called out; Myanmar's military accused of mass rape; female friendships persist across the West Bank barrier; Tanzania's First Lady speaks out on maternal deaths.

Welcome to our new Weekly Global Reproductive Justice Roundup! Each week, reporter Jessica Mack will summarize reproductive and sexual health and justice news from around the world.  We will still report in depth on some of these stories, but we want to make sure you get a sense of the rest and the best.

Eking Out Abortion Access in Argentina

Last week, Argentina’s Supreme Court ruled that all rape victims are eligible for legal abortions. This is a major breakthrough, as prior law allowed abortion only for rape victims who also had verified mental disabilities. The decision came after a 15-year old girl was raped and impregnated by her stepfather, and, though she had no mental disability, petitioned for an abortion anyway. Brave girl – and the women of Argentina will thank her. Her request was first denied, then approved, then challenged by the Public Defender of Chubut Province, who appealed on behalf of her… fetus. Finally, the national Supreme Court stepped in. Luckily, she was able to obtain an abortion amidst all the legal drama. For many young women who find themselves at the center of landmark abortion rights cases, the decisions come too late. In KL v. Peru, a woman was forced to deliver and then breastfeed her anencephalic fetus before it died days later. Gillian Kane of Ipas has an extensive analysis of the law change here, including what it signifies for abortion rights in Latin America more broadly. Via Associated Press.               

Anti-Gay Evangelical American Preacher Sued by Ugandan Rights Activists 
Scott Lively, an American preacher best known for his outspoken and violent feelings toward homosexuality, and linked with Uganda’s infamous “Kill the Gays” Bill, (tabled in 2009 and recently reintroduced), is finally being called out globally for his hateful bullshit. The gay rights group Sexual Minorities Uganda has accused Lively of inciting local hate crimes, homophobia, and horribly oppressive policies outlawing homosexuality. The New York Times contacted Lively about the lawsuit, though he said he hadn’t heard about it yet. He is being sued through the “Alien Tort Statute,” which allows a US citizens to be sued in US courts if he or she is accused of breaking international laws. Since gay rights activists in Uganda have little legal or social support, suing Lively in the US, where the movement is much more developed, is an excellent tactic. Anti-homosexuality bills aren’t the only thing that far-right radical American activists can be linked with overseas; they are also involved in pushing an array of anti-woman laws. Remember when Rep. Chris Smith (R-NJ) was caught spreading anti-choice rhetoric in Kenya during a congressional recess? Via Global Post.

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Fresh Accusations of Rape and Torture for the Myanmar Military
Human Rights Watch today released a near-100 page report detailing gruesome crimes of the Myanmar army in the country’s northern Kachin State, including mass rape, torture, and forced child labor. In January, the ruling military regime, which has ruled the country under dictatorship for almost 50 years, shocked and delighted the world when they released more than 650 political prisoners, and began a dialogue with famed democratic activist Aung San Suu Kyi. The Obama Administration has said they are open to lifting sanctions on the country. This latest news proves almost certainly that it’s too early to celebrate, particularly for ethnic minority and refugee women, who have little (if any) security. Here’s a worthwhile interview with Zipporah Sein, a leader in the ethnic minority Karen community, on sexual violence and women’s rights in Myanmar. Via BusinessWeek.

A Picture of Female Friendships, Enduring Across the West Bank Barrier
Peace x Peace, an organization whose goal is to “raise women’s voices, build cultures of peace,” has produced a beautiful short video documenting the enduring friendship of two best friends, one Israeli and one Palestinian. The women meet after being separated from a year and discuss the importance of connecting their families across the wall which separates the West Bank, and of overcoming the conflict of the two states. “Enough is enough; enough is enough; enough is enough,” they chant, as the camera fades to black. The film is called Catalyst Series. Hat tip Gender Across Borders.

Tanzania’s Maternal Deaths Too Slow To Fall, Says First Lady
Mama Kikwete, the First Lady of Tanzania, is a vocal advocate for several global health issues, including maternal and child health. Speaking at an event last week, she declared frustration about the country’s maternal mortality rate, which has been too slow to fall despite concerted efforts and promises to reduce it. She subtly implied that the government could do more. Her husband, President Jakaya Kikwete, is generally a great advocate and voice on these issues. Last year, along with Canadian Prime Minister Harper, he co-chaired an elite panel convened to track progress on the UN’s Strategy on Women’s and Children’s Health. It’s not that political will is not there in terms of rhetoric, but actions and results have been far too slow. A lot of talk and too little action is a familiar and perplexing pattern, and makes it nearly impossible for countries to achieve the goal of reducing maternal mortality by three-fourths by 2015. Mama Kikwete also stressed families’ and communities’ responsibilities in reducing the deaths of women in pregnancy and labor, and its a good point where there often is no doctor or equipped facility. Via AllAfrica.com

Roundups Politics

Campaign Week in Review: Tim Kaine Outlines Plan to ‘Make Housing Fair’

Ally Boguhn

“A house is more than just a place to sleep. It's part of the foundation on which a family can build a life,” wrote Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA). “Where you live determines the jobs you can find, the schools your children can attend, the air you breathe and the opportunities you have. And when you are blocked from living where you want, it cuts to the core of who you are.”

Donald Trump made some controversial changes to his campaign staff this week, and Sen. Tim Kaine (D-VA) noted his commitment to better housing policies.

Trump Hires Controversial Conservative Media Figure

Republican presidential nominee Trump made two notable additions to his campaign staff this week, hiring Breitbart News’ Stephen Bannon as CEO and GOP pollster Kellyanne Conway as campaign manager.

“I have known Steve and Kellyanne both for many years. They are extremely capable, highly qualified people who love to win and know how to win,” said Trump in a Wednesday statement announcing the hires. “I believe we’re adding some of the best talents in politics, with the experience and expertise needed to defeat Hillary Clinton in November and continue to share my message and vision to Make America Great Again.”

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Both have been criticized as being divisive figures.

Conway, for example, previously advised then-client Todd Akin to wait out the backlash after his notorious “legitimate rape” comments, comparing the controversy to “the Waco with David Koresh situation where they’re trying to smoke him out with the SWAT teams.” According to the Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC), Conway is also “often cited by anti-immigrant and anti-Muslim organizations such as the think tank Center for Security Policy and NumbersUSA.”

Under Bannon’s leadership, “mainstream conservative website” Breitbart.com changed “into a cesspool of the alt-right,” suggested the publication’s former editor at large, Ben Shapiro, in a piece for the Washington Post‘s PostEverything. “It’s a movement shot through with racism and anti-Semitism.”

Speaking with ABC News this week, Kurt Bardella, who also previously worked with Bannon at Breitbart, alleged that Bannon had exhibited “nationalism and hatred for immigrants, people coming into this country to try to get a better life for themselves” during editorial calls.

“If anyone sat there and listened to that call, you’d think that you were attending a white supremacist rally,” said Bardella.

Trump’s new hire drew heated criticism from the Clinton campaign in a Wednesday press call. “The Breitbart organization has been known to defend white supremacists,” said Robby Mook, Clinton’s campaign manager. After pointing to an analysis from the SPLC linking Breitbart to the extremist alt-right movement, Mook listed a number of other controversial positions pushed by the site.

“Breitbart has compared the work of Planned Parenthood to the Holocaust. They’ve also repeatedly used anti-LGBT slurs in their coverage. And finally, like Trump himself, Breitbart and Bannon have frequently trafficked in all sorts of deranged conspiracy theories from touting that President Obama was not born in America to claiming that the Obama Administration was ‘importing more hating Muslims.’”

“It’s clear that [Trump’s] divisive, erratic, and dangerous rhetoric simply represents who he really is,” continued Mook.

Kaine Outlines Plan to “Make Housing Fair”

Clinton’s vice presidential nominee Kaine wrote an essay for CNN late last week explaining how the Clinton-Kaine ticket can “make housing fair” in the United States.

“A house is more than just a place to sleep. It’s part of the foundation on which a family can build a life,” wrote Kaine. “Where you live determines the jobs you can find, the schools your children can attend, the air you breathe and the opportunities you have. And when you are blocked from living where you want, it cuts to the core of who you are.”

Kaine shared the story of Lorraine, a young Black woman who had experienced housing discrimination, whom Kaine had represented pro bono just after completing law school.

“This is one issue that shows the essential role government can play in creating a fairer society. Sen. Ed Brooke, an African-American Republican from Massachusetts, and Sen. Walter Mondale, a white Democrat from Minnesota, came together to draft the Fair Housing Act, which protects people from discrimination in the housing market,” noted Kaine, pointing to the 1968 law.

“Today, more action is still needed. That’s why Hillary Clinton and I have a bold, progressive plan to fight housing inequities across Americaespecially in communities that have been left out or left behind,” Kaine continued.

The Virginia senator outlined some of the key related components of Clinton’s “Breaking Every Barrier Agenda,” including an initiative to offer $10,000 in down payment assistance to new homebuyers that earn less than the median income in a given area, and plans to “bolster resources to enforce Fair Housing laws and fight housing discrimination in all its forms.”

The need for fair and affordable housing is a pressing issue for people throughout the country.

“It is estimated that each year more than four million acts of [housing] discrimination occur in the rental market alone,” found a 2015 analysis by the National Fair Housing Alliance.

No county in the United States has enough affordable housing to accommodate the needs of those with low incomes, according to a 2015 report released by the Urban Institute. “Since 2000, rents have risen while the number of renters who need low-priced housing has increased,” explained the report. “Nationwide, only 28 adequate and affordable units are available for every 100 renter households with incomes at or below 30 percent of the area median income.”

What Else We’re Reading

CBS News’ Will Rahn penned a primer explaining Trump campaign CEO Bannon’s relationship to the alt-right.

White supremacists and the alt-right “rejoice[d]” after Trump hired Bannon, reported Betsy Woodruff and Gideon Resnick for the Daily Beast.

Clinton published an essay in Teen Vogue this week encouraging young people to fight for what they care about, learn from those with whom they disagree, and get out the vote.

“In calling for ‘extreme vetting’ of foreigners entering the United States, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump suggested a return to a 1950s-era immigration standard—since abandoned—that barred entry to people based on their political beliefs,” explained USA Today.

Trump wants to cut a visa program “his own companies have used … to bring in hundreds of foreign workers, including fashion models for his modeling agency who need exhibit no special skills,” according to a report by the New York Times.

A Koch-backed group “has unleashed an aggressive campaign to kill a ballot measure in South Dakota that would require Koch-affiliated groups and others like them to reveal their donors’ identities.”

News Politics

Ohio Legislator: ‘Aggressive Attacks’ May Block Voters From the Polls

Ally Boguhn

Efforts to remove voters from state rolls and curb access to the polls could have an outsized impact in Ohio, which has seen a surge of anti-choice legislation under the state’s Republican leadership.

Ohio Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D-Kent) said she is worried about the impact of what she called “aggressive attacks” on voting rights in her state.

Ohio voters who have not engaged in voter activity in a fixed period of time, generally two years, are considered by the state to have moved, which then begins the process of removing them from their rolls through something called the “Supplemental Process.” If a voter fails to respond to a postcard mailed to them to confirm their address, they become “inactive voters.” If an inactive voter does not engage in voter activity for four years, they’re automatically unregistered to vote and must re-register to cast a ballot. 

Though other states routinely clean voting rolls, most don’t use failure to vote as a reason to remove someone.

“We have two million voters purged from the rolls in the last five years, many in the last four years since the last presidential election,” Clyde said during an interview with Rewire

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Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted (R) dismissed concerns of the voter purges’ impact during an interview with Reuters. “If this is really important thing to you in your life, voting, you probably would have done so within a six-year period,” he said.

Ohio’s removal of voters through this process “is particularly problematic in the lead-up to the November 2016 federal election because voters who voted in the high-turnout 2008 federal election (but who did not vote in any subsequent elections) were removed from voter rolls in 2015,” according to an amicus curiae brief filed by the U.S. Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Civil Rights division in support of those who filed suit against Ohio’s law. 

The DOJ has urged the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reverse a lower court’s ruling in favor of the state, writing that Ohio’s voter purge violates the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 and the Help America Vote Act of 2002.

Since 2012, at least 144,000 voters have been removed from Ohio’s voter rolls in its three biggest counties, Reuters reported. The secretary of state’s office said 2 million registered voters had been taken off the rolls in the past five years, though many had been removed because they were deceased.

Husted contends that he is just enforcing the law. “Ohio manages its voter rolls in direct compliance of both federal and state laws, and is consistent with an agreement in this same federal court just four years ago,” Husted said in an April statement after the ACLU of Ohio and Demos, a voting rights organization, filed a lawsuit in the matter.

In predominantly Black neighborhoods near downtown Cincinnati, “more than 10 percent of registered voters have been removed due to inactivity since 2012,” reported Reuters. The outlet found that several places where more voters had cast ballots for President Obama in 2012 were the same locations experiencing higher percentages of purged voters.

“Some of the data is showing that African Americans voters and Democratic voters were much more likely affected,” Clyde said when discussing the state’s purge of registered voters. 

Clyde has requested data on those purged from the rolls, but has been turned down twice. “They’ve said no in two different ways and are referring me to the boards of elections, but there are 88 boards of election,” she told RewireWith limited staff resources to devote to data collection, Clyde is still searching for a way to get answers.

In the meantime, many otherwise eligible voters may have their votes thrown away and never know it.

“[P]eople that had been purged often don’t know that they’ve been purged, so they may show up to vote and find their name isn’t on the roll,” Clyde said. “Then, typically that voter is given a provisional ballot and … told that the board of elections will figure out the problem with their voter registration. And then they don’t really receive notice that that provisional ballot doesn’t eventually count.” 

Though the state’s voter purges could continue to disenfranchise voters across the state, it is hardly the only effort that may impact voting rights there.

“There have been a number of efforts undertaken by the GOP in Ohio to make voting more difficult,” Clyde said. “That includes fighting to shorten the number of early voting days available, that includes fighting to throw out people’s votes that have been cast—whether it be a provisional ballot or absentee ballot—and that includes purging more voters than any other state.” 

This could make a big difference for voters in the state, which has seen a surge of anti-choice legislation under the state’s Republican leadership—including failed Republican presidential candidate Gov. John Kasich.

“So aside from the terrible effect that has on the fundamental right to vote in Ohio, progressives who maybe are infrequent voters or are seeing what’s happening around [reproductive rights and health] issues and want to express that through their vote may experience problems in Ohio because of these aggressive attacks on voting rights,” Clyde said. 

“From our presidential candidates on down to our candidates for the state legislature, there is a lot at stake when it comes to reproductive health care and reproductive rights in this election,” Clyde added. “So I think that, if that is an issue that is important to any Ohioan, they need to have their voice heard in this election.” 

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