News Politics

Cardinal Sorry He Attacked Rape Victim

Robin Marty

Trying to score political points against the governor, one Illinois Cardinal regrets that he inadvertantly attacked a rape victim in the process.

Many anti-choice advocates won’t skip an opportunity to try and score points against a pro-choice opponent.  So when a Catholic Cardinal wanted to criticize the governor of Illinois for his support of a pro-choice organization, he didn’t bother to “get all the facts” about the situation itself.

Like the fact that Governor Quin was honoring an advocate for victims of rape – one who is herself a former survivor.

Via the Chicago Tribune:

Cardinal Francis George said Sunday that he did not have all the facts when the Catholic Conference of Illinois issued a statement decrying Gov. Pat Quinn for his involvement with an abortion-rights organization that, it turned out, plans to give an award to an advocate for rape victims.

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“I deeply regret that,” George said Sunday afternoon, en route to Holy Name Cathedral in Chicago, where he was scheduled to present awards to parishioners for their dedication to ministries. “A rape victim demands all the respect and sympathy that anybody can give.”

He said that the Catholic Conference of Illinois, which advises the church on policy, did not inform the bishops about Goodman or her personal story of sexual assault.

“I first heard of Ms. Goodman only after we had crafted the statement (and) published it. Then, all of a sudden she comes forward. All of a sudden, she was there, and that wasn’t part of the story as we did it,” George said.

The Cardinal said that having known the award recipient was a rape survivor might have changed his statement.  Yet if they had their way, a growing number in the anti-choice movement still wouldn’t allow her to have an abortion.  Respect and sympathy, yes, but not bodily autonomy.

News Abortion

Illinois Parental Notification Law Heading Back To Court

Robin Marty

The law, which has been blocked for over 15 years, will now be heard by the state Supreme Court.

Despite being approved over 15 years ago, the Illinois law requiring a parent of a girl under the age of 18 to be notified prior to her receiving an abortion has never been enforced.  But that could be changing now that the state Supreme Court is getting involved.

Via the Chicago Tribune:

The Illinois Supreme Court has agreed to consider a dispute over whether the state must begin enforcing a law requiring parents to be notified before their children can obtain an abortion.

The law dates back to 1995 but has never been enforced because of court actions.

Opponents claim it violates the privacy, equal protection and gender-equality clauses of the Illinois constitution.

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Illinois is one of five states that has parental notification laws that are currently blocked by the courts.

Obama Anti-Abortion Billboards Covered By Protesters

Robin Marty

The controversial Chicago billboards are being draped with alternative messages.

The creators of the controversial anti-abortion billboards in Chicago that feature a likeness of President Obama with a message to stop abortion are getting a second round of media attention. But this time, it’s because of their billboards’ lack of visibility.

No, the group hasn’t taken them down.  Instead, individuals appear to be making an effort to cover up the signs themselves.

Via The Chicago Tribune:

Two of the three identical ads — which feature an image of President Barack Obama and the words “Every 21 minutes our next possible leader is aborted” — were covered with fabric banners with messages scrawled in red paint.

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One banner says: “In 21 minutes this sign should be gone.” A second banner, which dangled from the billboard Sunday after being blown by the wind, says, “Abort Racism.”

The unidentified protesters who have covered the boards identify themselves as “social workers and community members,” and say they are with no particular group.

The original billboards have drawn intense criticism, especially from the Black Women for Reproductive Justice, who thoroughly condemned the ads.