News Maternity and Birthing

Five Couples Win IVF Treatments In a Surprise Radio Contest Twist

Robin Marty

Rather than pick one winner, the station chose them all.

After a radio station in Canada took large amounts of criticism for running a “win a baby” contest in which the winning couple would receive a free round of in vitro fertilization, the judges decided it couldn’t choose just one recipient, giving all five finalist couples the prize.

Via Globalnews.ca:

in a surprise twist, Jeff Mauler, one of the morning show personalities, announced: “The winner for win a baby…the winner is all of you.

The announcement was met with silence and then tears.

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“By the silence alone, everybody sitting in their cars, everybody sitting at work, everyone at their breakfast tables had an image of what these couples were doing. The silence was speaking a thousand words this morning,” he said.

Mauler said the twist came after a last minute decision over the weekend.

“Truly we knew that we just couldn’t go with one. They all had great stories. They are all wonderful people and we found a way to make it happen.”

The contest, which many claimed was in poor taste and made to exploit the desperation of the infertile, was dreamed up as a way to bring attention to the expense of fertility treatments, which are not covered by the Ontario government’s health care plan.

News Human Rights

Advocates: Trans Woman’s Killer Getting 12 Years in Prison ‘Not a Win’ for Trans Community

Kanya D’Almeida

Twenty-two trans and gender-nonconforming people were killed in 2015, almost double the number who were killed in 2014. The vast majority of homicide victims were people of color, mostly trans women of color, according to national statistics.

James Dixon, 25, will be sentenced to 12 years in prison for beating to death a 21-year-old Black trans woman, Islan Nettles, in August 2013 in New York City.

The sentencing date comes two weeks after Dixon pleaded guilty to the top count of the New York State Supreme Court’s indictment against him—manslaughter in the first degree—following the revelation that his 2013 videotaped confession to prosecutors would be admitted as evidence into a jury trial.

Dixon would have faced a 17-year prison term if the jury had found him found guilty.

“With this conviction, James Dixon has finally been brought to justice for this brutal and lethal assault,” Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance said in an April 4 statement. “Members of the transgender community are far too often the targets of violent crime. I hope that this conviction provides some comfort to Ms. Nettles’ family and friends.”

Advocates and organizers, however, say the opposite is true.

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“This is not a win for the trans community,” Lourdes Hunter, co-founder and national director of the TransWomen of Color Collective (TWOCC), told Rewire in a phone interview. “James Dixon going to jail will not stop trans murders, it will not bring Islan Nettles back, it will not bring peace to Delores Nettles [Islan’s mother], who for many years sat in anguish as the murderer of her child roamed the streets due to the negligence of the New York Police Department and the New York District Attorney.”

Nettles was attacked just after midnight on August 17, 2013, when she and her two friends encountered a group of about seven men, including Dixon, in West Harlem, according to reports. Dixon, per those reports, stated in his confession that he had flirted with Nettles until his friends pointed out that she was transgender.

He says he then flew into “a blind fury,” first punching Nettles in the face and then striking her a second time while she lay on the sidewalk.

Accounts of the murder vary, with eyewitnesses and prosecutors claiming Dixon punched her several times and even slammed her head against the concrete pavement. Those allegations are confirmed by the New York District Attorney’s office, which concluded that Dixon “repeatedly struck the victim with a closed fist, causing serious brain injury, before fleeing the scene.”

Nettles’ mother, Delores, claims the assault rendered Nettles unrecognizable. At a protest in 2014 she blasted New York City officials for failing to send a detective to the hospital where Nettles lay in a coma; Delores stated, “half of my child’s brain is hanging out of her head,” according to the Washington Post.

Nettles was declared brain dead on August 20, and taken off mechanical support a few days later. Her death prompted large and sustained protests in New York City, including vigils and rallies that drew hundreds of people.

“Nettles was killed at an interesting time: The start of what we’re now seeing to be a more visible national trend in awareness and conversations about trans murders,” Shelby Chestnut, co-director of community organizing and public advocacy with the New York City-based Anti-Violence Project (AVP), told Rewire in a phone interview.

Citing data collected by the AVP, which is the only national organization to track lethal violence against the trans community, Chestnut told Rewire that 22 trans and gender-nonconforming people were killed in 2015, almost double the number who were killed in 2014. The vast majority of homicide victims, she said, were people of color, mostly trans women of color.

Keyonna Blakeney, a 22-year-old Black trans woman, was murdered Saturday in Montgomery County, Maryland. An AVP spokesperson told Rewire that Blakeney is the ninth trans woman to be killed in 2016.

Chestnut told Rewire that Nettles’ death had a deep impact on the community because “the rest of the world sees New York City as a safe haven for LGBT people, but in fact its no different from anywhere else—trans people are still subjected to violence, and in some cases death, simply because of who they are.”

Chestnut said Dixon’s confession invokes what’s called the “trans panic defense”—a legal tactic used to convince judges or juries that a victim’s sexual identity both explains and excuses a perpetrators’ “loss of self-control” and resulting assault. This type of defense has been outlawed in California, and the American Bar Association has called on other states to ban it as well.

“Sadly the media has been focusing on this so-called panic defense, which adds to a really terrible, transphobic narrative that there is something fundamentally wrong with being trans when in fact there is nothing wrong with it,” Chestnut added.

Both Chestnut and TWOCC’s Hunter agree that locking Dixon up will not stem the tide of violence against the trans community, since mass incarceration has proved to be an outright failure in terms of preventing crime.

“Sending someone to prison is not ‘justice,'” Chestnut said. “We need to address the bigger, systemic issue, which is: Why is violence like this allowed to permeate our society? And how are we investing in modes of prevention and education for everyone, so that a young, trans women of color can walk down the street and not be killed simply for who she is?”

“In the United States the life expectancy of a trans woman of color is less than 35 years,” Hunter added. “We can no longer ignore that state-sanctioned violence, including [that] the denial and lack of access to jobs, housing, and health care is inextricably linked to the physical violence we face every day. If you don’t have a job and can’t pay your rent, you may be forced to engage in activities for survival that further endanger your life.”

Ten percent of 6,400 transgender adults interviewed for a national survey had engaged in survival sex work between 2008 and 2009, a number that rose to 33.2 percent among trans Latino/a respondents and 39.9 percent among Black respondents, as Rewire has reported.

Trans communities experience disproportionate rates of homeless and incarceration, with 47 percent of Black transgender people having experienced incarceration.

Nettles had been forging a pathway for herself out of this cycle of poverty and violence when she was killed. Hunter said Nettles had just moved into her first apartment, was attending school, holding a steady job, and was an active member of the community, even volunteering at a local homeless shelter—all of which may have contributed to the wave of protests that followed her death.

“There are all these ‘respectability politics’ involved in narratives around trans lives,” Hunter told Rewire. “For instance, Nettles was not engaging in street-based sex work or trying to ‘trick’ people about her identity; when Dixon questioned her, she proudly affirmed that she was trans. Basically she did not fit easily into the stereotyped narrative that the media likes to present about trans women.”

Hunter said a broad coalition of local advocates supported justice for Nettles and her family members. While these advocacy efforts almost certainly played a role in pushing the District Attorney’s office toward a resolution of the case, Hunter says it’s important to fight back against the notion of “respectability.”

“We need to stand up and fight for all trans lives, not just the ones that are deemed ‘respectable,’ because no trans person deserves to die,” Hunter said. “Given the historical lack of [effort] to bring closure to these heinous crimes, the only appropriate response for D.A. Vance is to launch a concerted effort to re-open all cold cases of trans murders in New York City.”

“This is why we say ‘Not One More,’” Hunter said, referring to TWOCC’s video campaign. “At the core of this campaign is the message that we cannot be silent, we cannot wait until a trans woman of color is murdered to celebrate who we are and raise awareness and visibility around our lives, and around the women whose lives were taken away without them being able to experience the happiness and joy that is entitled to all of us as humans.”

Commentary Media

Raymond Moore May Have Resigned, But His Comments About Women’s Tennis Betray a Broader Problem

Shireen Ahmed

What this situation makes clear is the glaring reality that women's tennis players often don't have institutionalized support or solidarity from their male colleagues.

Just before the final match of the BNP Paribas Open Tournament in Indian Wells, California, on March 20, tournament director Raymond Moore stunned the tennis world with misguided, sexist comments regarding women’s tennis. The aftermath is somewhat reminiscent of a shoddy political campaigncomplete with inappropriate gaffes, a deluge of critiques, apologies, and then a resignation.

Sexism in sports is quite prevalent, so women are accustomed to seeing reports of asinine commentary. The frequency of such attitudes does not mean that such remarks are not harmful to women’s sports or that they ought to be taken lightly. What this situation makes clear, however, is the glaring reality that women’s tennis players often don’t have institutionalized support or solidarity from their male colleagues. This is discouraging, as tennis is widely regarded by members of the media as the sport that other federations should look to as an example of pay equity and camaraderie. Women consistently fight battles on their own with little backup from male players, men’s tennis associations, and other athletes. This is part of the problem in a system that allows sexism to flourish in women’s sports.

Moore chose to make mind-bogglingly misplaced comments to the usual media scrum that precedes the final match. His comments were unprovoked and unrelated to any specific issue. Instead, he simply offered his observations on female players: “I think the WTA [Women’s Tennis Association] … you know, in my next life when I come back I want to be someone in the WTA, because they ride on the coattails of the men,” Moore said. “They don’t make any decisions and they are lucky. They are very, very lucky. If I was a lady player, I’d go down every night on my knees and thank God that Roger Federer and Rafa Nadal were born, because they have carried this sport. They really have.”

To add insult to injury, Moore proceeded to comment on—wait for itthe level of physical beauty of specific players. Moore named Eugenie Bouchard of Canada and Garbine Muguruza of Spain as being among the “attractive prospects” on the tour. When asked to clarify about what he meant by attractive. Moore replied, “They are physically attractive and competitively attractive,” he said. “They can assume the mantle of leadership once Serena [Williams] decides to stop. They really have quite a few very, very attractive players.”

As a fan of tennis, I was aghast. And as a feminist sports writer, I was horrified.

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In addition to being inappropriate and insulting, Moore’s comments were factually incorrect. When I think of this sport, I think of a legendary history of advocacy coupled with enthralling athleticism displayed by female tennis superstars. In 1956, Althea Gibson became the first Black woman to win a major international tournament after years of being shut out by the all-white U.S. Lawn Tennis Association. She battled racist systems and even against hotels who would refuse to book a space in their establishments for a luncheon to honor her and her accomplishments. Gibson certainly helped to elevate the standards of the game.

Perhaps Moore also forgot about Billie Jean King. King engulfed herself in advocating for women’s rights after realizing that a woman’s place in tennis was economically restricted. When King won Wimbledon in 1968, she received £750, but her male counterpart Rod Laver won £2000. In 1973, she famously accepted a challenge from self-proclaimed “male chauvinist” Bobby Riggs and won in three straight sets. Not only did an estimated 50 million people across 37 countries watch the epic “Battle of the Sexes,” but King drew much-needed attention to financial inequality and created the WTA. Former professional tennis player Chris Evert has said of King’s contributions: “Everybody should thank her and shake her hand. She put money in our pockets and provided a living for hundreds and hundreds of female athletes.”

And then there is Serena Williams, who was competing at the tournament in question and who has been hailed by tennis pundits as the best player the United States has ever produced of all time. The 21-time Grand Slam winner is not only a champion of women’s sports; she is a one of the female athletes who routinely speaks up about issues that affect them. Williams has been the target of ruthless and racist sports media. She has been maligned, yet still uses her platform to connect with important organizations such as Equal Justice Initiative and has boycotted major tournaments because of her convictions. And Williams enthralls and inspires million of people with her grace, strength, and top form.

Thanks in part to the work of Gibson, King, Williams, and others, gender inequity is not as stark in tennis as it is in other sports. Tennis associations are reputed to be the most even-salaried for women and their male counterparts. However, if Moore’s comment and others are any indication, it seems as if ingrained sexist ideologies simmer under the lid.

The reactions to Moore’s comments, from King, Evert, and Martina Navratilova, to name a few players, were swift and appropriately angry:

Williams, meanwhile, was very eloquent in her reaction to Moore’s comments: “You know, there’s only one way to interpret that. Get on your knees, which is offensive enough, and thank a man, which is not—we, as women, have come a long way. We shouldn’t have to drop to our knees at any point.”

Williams reiterated the point that the 2015 U.S. Open women’s finals sold out before the men’s. It is not the case that men shoulder more responsibility or interest in tennis more so than women. And, as Jane McManus of espnW noted, Moore’s comments call into question his ability to be an effective tournament director for a co-ed event that relies on the celebrity of the women’s game. “You can’t have a tournament director for a men’s and women’s tournament who doesn’t believe the women carry their weight,” McManus wrote.

In the midst of this criticism, Moore issued an eager apology.

While Moore was trying to navigate through the mess he created, sports media outlets asked other prominent players what they thought of his comments. Very unfortunately, the world’s number-one ranked male player, Novak Djokovic, used the opportunity to lecture awkwardly about how pay inequality would be justified because men garner more income than women on the tennis circuit.

“I think that our men’s tennis world … should fight for more, because the stats are showing that we have much more spectators on the men’s tennis matches,” Djokovic said. “I think that’s one of the, you know, reasons why maybe we should get awarded more.”

Djokovic also added in some inexplicable comments about women’s bodies and their hormones—yes, hormones—going through “different things.” He ended his obtuse statement with the very subtle: “Ladies know what I am talking about.”

The stream of off-the-cuff sexist remarks and subsequent apologies is very popular, apparently. After being counseled by fellow tennis player Andy Murray, Djokovic insisted in a Facebook post that he never meant any offense or “negative connotations.”

But his knee-jerk reaction was also to insist that his comments were taken out of context. Instead of stating that he was wrong and will not repeat the same mistake, he placed the burden on others who might have been offended for taking his comments “the wrong way.”

I don’t believe his comments were interpreted incorrectly; I believe he, like many male sports stars, was simply unwilling to own up to his comments.

Sports writer and tennis enthusiast Lindsay Gibbs reported for ThinkProgress that when the Association of Tennis Professionals was asked to comment on Moore or Djokovic’s remarks, its statement was a baffling argument against equal prize money.

“That’s right—given a very obvious opportunity to take a strong stand against sexism and promote equality, men’s tennis instead decided to make the argument against equal prize money,” Gibbs wrote. “This cycle is as exhausting as it is self-defeating.”

There are those who avoid these messes by educating themselves and properly articulating their support of women’s tennis. Former pro tennis player Patrick McEnroe said he was “livid” at Moore’s comments and publicly called for him to resign.

WTA Tour Chief Executive Steve Simon also declared his unwavering endorsement of equal pay for female players before the start of the Miami Open. And Murray was quick to denounce Djokovic’s position and insisted that his words “do not stack up.” He mentioned that quite often, tennis fans come to watch Williams specifically.

Overall, though, the advocacy offered to women is unstable and inconsistent. While discussing how women mobilized to earn a proper salary, King told espnW during an interview at Wimbledon last year, “The men will never give us credit.”

The dim silver lining of all this seems to be that wider discussions of gender inequality in pay and institutionalized sexism have been prevalent in mainstream, male-dominated sports media, which would otherwise seldom address such topics. But so long as there are men in positions of power asked to comment on issues in women’s sports—as is the case with tennis—they also need to participate in vocalizing their support for female athletes. Solidarity with women, which includes not maligning the efforts of female athletes, is important to ensuring consistent growth of the sport. For men at all levels to reiterate that women’s sports are powerful and exciting goes a long way in dismantling sexist ideology suggesting women’s sports do not hold broad appeal, that they are somehow less “interesting” than men’s sports, or that, like Moore suggested, they are piggybacking off male athletes’ success.

While men remain in the roles of executive directors, administrators, and decision makers, it is crucial for them to back up female playersparticularly because that recognition is well deserved.

So many women’s tennis players have brought issues of social justice to the forefront. They are addressing pressing issues of sexism but also of race, class, and gender identity. These feats go far beyond only winning trophies. These women are fostering change in society through sports.

How unjust and ignorant of Moore to erase these accomplishments.

On March 21, Moore resigned as tournament director of Indian Wells. I sincerely hope that the next tournament director is far more enlightened of the enormous contributions to tennis and sports that female players have had.

Moore’s initial comments ballooned into an issue involving other men and highlighted the recurring sexism that plagues sports. Their mea culpas ring hollow at a time when women’s tennis features brilliant female players. The point is certainly not to avoid making sexist comments in front of the cameras. It is to understand that sexist comments are doing a disservice to the sport and are incorrect and unjust, and must be addressed and corrected by everyone, not just the women they affect directly.

It was not only Title IX nor the “coattails of men” that created the genius and success of women’s tennis; it was the women themselves.

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