News Abortion

“Jane Roe” Gets a Movie Gig

Robin Marty

The plantiff in the Roe V. Wade case, will now be in a film as an anti-choice activist

First Abby Johnson gets a television commercial, now Jane Roe is getting an acting gig.

Via Reuters:

Norma McCorvey, a.k.a. Jane Roe, appears in “Doonby,” a psychological thriller from British writer/director Peter Mackenzie. She plays an elderly woman who tries to talk the expectant mother out of going through with her plan.

Like This Story?

Your $10 tax-deductible contribution helps support our research, reporting, and analysis.

Donate Now

Mackenzie wanted to cast someone with the gravitas to deliver anti-abortion dialogue without being preachy. So last year, over lunch at a restaurant in tiny Smithville, Texas, he persuaded McGreevy, one of the most controversial living Americans, to play the role, despite the fact she had never acted before.

The film’s creators claim that the film is “apolitical.”  It was funded by $2 million from a donor who “wished to remain anonymous.”

Norma McCorvey, aka “Jane Roe,” Arrested at Sotomayor Hearing

Brady Swenson

Norma McCorvey, the "Roe" in Roe v. Wade, was arrested at the confirmation hearing of Sonia Sotomayor among a wave of anti-abortion protesters who lined the sidewalks outside the Senate office buildings.

The woman at the center of the Supreme Court’s landmark abortion rights
ruling was arrested today at the confirmation hearing for Sonia
Sotomayor among a wave of anti-abortion protesters who lined the
sidewalks outside the Senate office buildings and several of whom made
it into the hearing room and disrupted in an attempt to disrupt the
proceedings.

Norma McCorvey, 61, of Texas, better known as "Jane Roe" in the famous Roe v. Wade
case from January 1973, was arrested after she and another protester
started yelling during the opening statement of Sen. Al Franken
(D-Minn.), according to Capitol Police. McCorvey, whose pursuit of the
right to access to abortion in the early 1970s led to the ruling that
has been a pivotal part of every Supreme Court nomination process
since, eventually become a notable opponent of the procedure.

Read the rest of the story and watch video at the Wasington Post…

Like This Story?

Your $10 tax-deductible contribution helps support our research, reporting, and analysis.

Donate Now