Get Real: Age 13 and “100%” Ready for Sex?

Heather Corinna

Just. Slow. Down. You keep saying you just don't know about all of this. That's okay: you don't have to know. But do yourself a favor and don't put yourself in a position where you have to.

vergin_13confussd asks:

Im 13 and a vigin and my boyfriend is 13 and not a vigin, and we’re 100% ready 2 have sex, but the problem is that hes in south carolina and im in minnsota. Wen I lived in sc he went 2 my skool and we never talked. But there was a girl that would always say bad stuff about him, like hes slept wit every girl in the skool and hes such a bad guy, blah blah blah. so 1 day i messaged him on myspace and i gave him my number 2 txt me. i wanted 2 hear his side of the story. we got 2 no each other and we fell in love. im just worried that hes not done with his cheating ways, n that after we have sex hes gunna leave me. 1 of his ex’s says that hes telling her that he doesnt love me and that he wuld cheat on me, but it depends on who. and that hes jus using me. idk wat 2 believe anymore!! i love him with all my heart and we believe were soulmates!!! ive never felt like this b4. and he says the same thing. my question is: how do ik he is gunna change and not leave me? and how do ik hes not jus tellin me wat i wanna hear? he says that im gunna b perfect in bed, but im jus so worried that im not gunna b as gudas he hopes. how do ik i’ll b good? i really need 2 no!! im desperatly confused and dk wt 2 do!!!! my mom says he means wat he says 2me and that she’s been threw sumthin like this. my heart says to stay with him and my gut says that stay with him but yor gunna get hurt. i jus dk. i really need help!! Thanks Heather!!!

Heather Corinna replies:

I can’t make these choices for you, and I think it’s really important you make and own your own choices in relationships and in sex once you start choosing to have them be part of your life. What I can do for you is to try and give you some extra information and perspective, based on what you’ve said here, that I think you might need and would be good to consider when you’re making these choices.

Appreciate our work?

Vote now! And help Rewire earn a bigger grant from CREDO:

VOTE NOW

A lot of what you’re saying suggests that both of your expectations, about sex and also about this relationship, are probably unrealistic. When that’s the case, it’s so hard to make good choices. In your profile here at the site, you talk about how you want to have sex just to get it over with, but that you want it to be very “romantic, memorable and special.” Those two things are usually at odds with each other, and from the sound of your question here, you’re much more invested in that big stuff than you are in just “getting sex over with.” People who earnestly want to just get sex over with don’t tend to ask the things you’re asking.

What I’d like to do is go through some pieces of what you’ve posted here and give you a reality check around them. Hopefully, what perspectives I can add to what you’re asking and what you’re already thinking, feeling and wanting will help you get more clarity around all of this and help you make the choices that are most likely to result in what you really, really want.

We’re 100% ready to have sex

I’m not sure anyone can know we’re 100% ready for sex with anyone we haven’t had that kind of sex with before and/or when we haven’t had sex with anyone, period. Until we’ve been having that kind of sex with that particular person — or have at least had some kind of sex with them, and have been interacting with then in ways that give us real cues about how it might go, which does mean time spent together in-person — we just can’t predict a lot of how it’s going to go, what it could be like, how we’re all going to feel about it, or what the outcomes are going to be, positive, negative and neutral. If we’re also not in touch with the overall and general possible realities and outcomes of something in general, we can’t say we’re ready because we can’t know all that we’d possibly need to be ready for.

I’ve talked about this in a few columns in the past, but one thing we know about sex and age that’s very well documented is that the younger someone is, the more unrealistic their expectations of sex tend to be. In other words, what you expect sex to be like, to go like, to require of you and a partner at this age is probably a bit more off base than your expectations two years from now, a lot more off-base than your expectations will probably be four or five years from now, and way, way more off-base than your expectations will probably be ten years from now. That’s because in all those years, you’ll learn not just more about sex and relationships, and about other people, but you’ll find out and learn a lot more about yourself, including what you really want and need in sex and in love, what you can and can’t deal with, and what you being ready — not anyone else, just you, uniquely — really looks and feels like. In your teens and twenties, a lot of development happens pretty fast sometimes, so even just a difference of one year can be a lot bigger than it seems like it might be.

My guess is, particularly given your age, that you’re probably not ready for some of those potential outcomes of sex, and that he might not be either. If only the good stuff is being talked about, or the sexy stuff, and not any of the tough stuff, that’s another clue that one or both of you probably aren’t ready, because if you were, you’d know those things need to get talked about, too. For instance, you’re probably not ready to handle a pregnancy. You’re probably not ready to handle having sex, then having this relationship tank right after you’ve been so vulnerable and exposed. You or he may not be ready to handle taking safer sex seriously, which includes not just always using condoms, but each of you getting tested for STIs, something that if he hasn’t done yet having already been sexually active, which he probably hasn’t, gives you a big clue he’s so not ready.

You also might not be ready to handle even some outcomes you think you might want, like your boyfriend winding up very attached to you… maybe too much for your comfort. Or your own feelings being stronger…but him not reacting well to that and running scared. Or him indeed finding out he thinks you’re great in bed… and deciding that means that he only wants a sexual relationship with you, not something romantic after all. Even just managing having sex we really enjoy, and a sexual relationship that’s awesome can be tough to fit into the rest of our lives in a way we don’t blow the other important stuff, and that’s a lot harder when we’re a lot younger than it is a little later down the road.

I love him with all my heart and we believe we’re soulmates! I’ve never felt like this before, and he says the same thing.

Here’s the tricky thing about the idea of soulmates. Really, until we’ve lived a whole life, if there is such a thing as soulmates, or we feel we had one or more than one, we probably won’t be able to know who ours were until we’re old and grey when we can look back at many decades of life. I don’t mean to harsh your love buzz. I’m glad that you are experiencing such wonderful feelings, feelings I think matter and are important whether or not you’re soulmates, and whether or not this relationship lasts two weeks or fifty years. I think you should enjoy and value those feelings.

But when people say they believe that they’re soulmates, especially when they haven’t spent a lot of time together in their lives, when they haven’t been though some big life challenges together to know how they do or don’t help each other when the chips are seriously down, it’s usually mostly because they want that to be true. If that’s something you want — maybe even something you feel you need — then you want to walk here, not run. Because if you rush in too much, throw your whole heart in, take big risks and find out that isn’t true, it’s going to hurt like hell when it really doesn’t have to. People who believe in soulmates generally have the idea that those people have been together in lives before and/or will be important to each other for the whole life they’re in, and maybe even past that. That’s a long time. If someone really is going to that important for that long, and is somehow deeply linked to us that way, then it seems to me that there’s no hurry at all, and those folks have got all the time in the world — literally! — to get to know each other over time, to build a relationship over time, and to take plenty of time in all their choices together.

Both of you may not have felt this way before. However, chances are good that you will both not only probably feel this way again in your lives, with other people, you’ll probably experience feelings a lot deeper and more enduring than these, not because you’re shallow people or anything, but simply because the more life experience we gather, the more we grow, the richer and more complex feelings of love (and lust!) can tend to become.

What’s most common is for romantic relationships when we’re very young to be relatively short, or, if they last for more than a few weeks or months, for our feelings and interests to change well before adulthood. That doesn’t mean they’re not a big deal or not important: a relationship lasting a long time, or a lifetime, isn’t automatically more important or more valuable just because it did. There are an awful lot of people in long-term relationships that are really crappy, after all. It just means that both of you having these feelings for the first time doesn’t mean they’re the last time you’ll have them, are the last people you’ll have them with, or that this is as big as it gets. Believe it or not, these feelings can get a whole lot bigger.

How do I know he is going to change and not leave me? How do I know he’s not just telling me what I want to hear?

You don’t. You can’t know either of those things now. What you can do is take some more time to see how things pan out not just over weeks, but over months and years. You say you texted him because you wanted to hear his side of the story, but you also say you’re worried that he’ll “return to his cheating ways.” Does that mean that he verified that some of what had been said about him was true? If it does, then he’s got a pattern to change. That’s something he’ll need to take real time with to work on on his own, not something that’ll be magically fixed just by loving you a lot. If he has tended to make commitments he doesn’t honor, some of the work he’ll need to do is to stop being so quick to make those kinds of commitments, taking more time to make them and not making them until he really knows he can honor them. Time that, from the sounds of things, he hasn’t taken.

It’s crystal that it’s important to you that a person you have sex with is loyal to you and also doesn’t ditch you; that you’re not likely to feel comfortable with a sexual situation where you’re not strongly sure that’s not going to happen. That’s something that’s important to a lot of people, and also something that informs a lot of people’s decisions about who they have sex with and when they have any kind of sex. Some people are comfortable just going on hope and a prayer and seeing what happens, feeling capable of managing any rough emotional fallout. Other folks need more than that, or know they either aren’t up for handling that kind of fallout, or really want to try and avoid it.

You sound like the latter to me, and I’d honor yourself in your own wants and needs there. If you want and need those things, and it sounds like you do, take good care of yourself in that by taking the time to be pretty darn sure you’re going to get those needs met. You also seem to be saying it’s possible this guy has treated other partners poorly in the past, and it certainly sounds like more than one girl has not had a stellar experience with him. While sometimes people just talk trash, it’s always sound to figure you can’t know what’s trash and what’s truth in this kind of situation until you take more time to see how this person actually behaves over time.

He says that I’m going to be perfect in bed. How do I know I’ll be good? I really need to know!

This is another one of those things you can’t know, but I’d also think about why it’s so important to you to “be good in bed.” Being sexual with someone is an intimate thing to do with them, and when we’re getting that close to somebody, it should be okay to be as human as we are, including sucking at things sometimes or not knowing what the heck we’re doing. If you feel like you have to be perfect or worry you won’t perform up-to-par, remember, this isn’t supposed to be a performance. Sex — the first time or the 201st — is supposed to be an experience, and one where, ideally, all that’s expected of you is that you be yourself, you let the other person be themselves, and you both treat each other with care.

Just so you know, I think the whole idea of “good in bed” is stupid. I don’t think you’re stupid, or stupid for thinking that means something, just that it’s a stupid idea a lot of smart people get fooled into thinking is something other than stupid. Someone being a good lover generally has to do with things magazines don’t talk about and movies don’t show us: things like being a good communicator and a good listener, like being creative and imaginative, like being respectful and thoughtful and kind, like being willing to make a fool out of yourself, like being comfortable and confident in your own skin and around other people’s bodies. All of that stuff? All of that stuff tends to be what most of us do without trying too hard when we care about and have confidence in ourselves, care about and have confidence in other people, and when we are really invested in ourselves and other people and they’re really invested in themselves and us.

That feeling of just wanting to get first-time sex over with often comes from wanting to just get worries and anxieties like this over with — Will I be good? Will someone else think so? Will a sex partner stick around after I had sex with them? Will I get my heart broken? Will I even like sex? What if I don’t? What if I do? Here’s the thing a lot of people thinking that way don’t know yet: once you start having any kind of sex, if you’re still thinking the same way about those things — something that won’t change just because you had sex, but only if you change the way you think about it — those worries usually stick around or get even more crazymaking. On top of that, being sexually active brings with it a host of new things to worry about you aren’t worrying about yet, or things you have to be concerned with because they’re real and happening, not imagined or not happening yet. So, having sex to try and get rid of those worries is not exactly the smartest strategy most of the time, especially since having sex involves opening yourself up to a bunch of risks.

Here’s the good news: you can chill those worries and anxieties, without taking any risks at all you’re not ready to deal with, by changing how you think about this and by taking the pressure off by not getting involved with sex with someone else just yet. If you’re WAY worried about being good in bed, that tends to be because you’re not in the right space in your life or your own personal or sexual development to be secure enough in yourself to have sex with someone else. So, you don’t have to. Which means you don’t have to be concerned about this at all right now. I’m not trying to be a brain surgeon, nor am I doing any brain surgery, so it doesn’t matter whether or not I’m good at it. Get it?

When you are in a space where sex is the right thing for you and someone else, when you are in a relationship you feel pretty secure in, when you feel more secure with yourself, and when you’ve taken more time to develop, think about and explore your own sexuality (the one you have all by yourself and can explore in your own head and heart, and with your own hands), you won’t worry as much about this stuff. I promise. You’ll feel a lot more relaxed, and it’ll all seem like less of a huge deal. Some of why some of these worries probably feel so big is that you’re just not ready for the place you’re thinking about putting yourself in. I think your worries are trying to tell you something important that can help you make your own best choices.

While I know that long-distance relationships can be a bummer when you feel very strongly about someone and miss them, in this case, I actually think it’s probably a good thing. I’m saying that because I don’t think you two leaping into bed right now would be so great for you or be like you think it would. I strongly suspect you’d not get what you want and need in it, that it’d be way more likely for things to happen you really didn’t want or weren’t able to handle now than later. It sounds like in person, you’d have a hard time not being impulsive. There are also some cool parts of long-distance relationships I think you can take advantage of right now.

A lot of deep communication that’s not easily distracted by strong sexual feelings tends to happen when things are long-distance, for instance. I’m not talking about texting or IMs. I’m talking about long phone conversations and letters, things we put real time and effort in. Ideally, in that kind of communication you two will be talking about more than wanting to go to bed together, who is going to be good in bed, or sussing out if someone’s rep is or isn’t factual. You can also see if both of you feel strongly enough to keep up with letter writing, to really put some creativity into your communication, and to find out how deep all of this really is for both of you(or isn’t). Long-distance relationships also mean we have to take things more slowly, which is a good thing if we’re otherwise inclined to jump into the deep end before we have any idea of how to swim. It sounds like you need more time, and it sounds like you have that time.

I want to add that while it’s great you’re able to talk with your Mom, and great that she supports you in your feelings, she isn’t psychic. She can’t know that this guy means what he says, and whatever her previous dating experiences were can’t tell her that. It sounds like she may be projecting some of her own stuff here, and also like she just doesn’t want you to be upset, but I’d not put too much stock in her feeling that this guy must be on the up-and-up because someone she dated was. She didn’t date this guy (at least I certainly hope not!), so she can’t know his deal. That’s something only he, you and your mother can find out over time based on this relationship, not her past relationships.

I’ll leave you with some extra links that I think might help you out, but what I’d suggest is that you just. Slow. Down. You keep saying you just don’t know about all of this. That’s okay: you don’t have to know. But since you don’t know now, do yourself a favor and don’t put yourself in a position where you have to. I know it’s hard to slow things down when feelings are intense, but I think you’ll feel a whole lot better, and be better able to decide what’s right for you with your choices in this relationship, including any sexual choices, if you do. What you have here isn’t running so you have to chase it (and if it is, you know it’s not going to be a good deal). You can take plenty of time not only to make decisions, but also to just enjoy all the good stuff in this and see how it goes and where you’re comfortable taking it, step by step.

News Politics

Ohio Legislator: ‘Aggressive Attacks’ May Block Voters From the Polls

Ally Boguhn

Efforts to remove voters from state rolls and curb access to the polls could have an outsized impact in Ohio, which has seen a surge of anti-choice legislation under the state’s Republican leadership.

Ohio Rep. Kathleen Clyde (D-Kent) said she is worried about the impact of what she called “aggressive attacks” on voting rights in her state.

Ohio voters who have not engaged in voter activity in a fixed period of time, generally two years, are considered by the state to have moved, which then begins the process of removing them from their rolls through something called the “Supplemental Process.” If a voter fails to respond to a postcard mailed to them to confirm their address, they become “inactive voters.” If an inactive voter does not engage in voter activity for four years, they’re automatically unregistered to vote and must re-register to cast a ballot. 

Though other states routinely clean voting rolls, most don’t use failure to vote as a reason to remove someone.

“We have two million voters purged from the rolls in the last five years, many in the last four years since the last presidential election,” Clyde said during an interview with Rewire

Appreciate our work?

Vote now! And help Rewire earn a bigger grant from CREDO:

VOTE NOW

Ohio Secretary of State Jon Husted (R) dismissed concerns of the voter purges’ impact during an interview with Reuters. “If this is really important thing to you in your life, voting, you probably would have done so within a six-year period,” he said.

Ohio’s removal of voters through this process “is particularly problematic in the lead-up to the November 2016 federal election because voters who voted in the high-turnout 2008 federal election (but who did not vote in any subsequent elections) were removed from voter rolls in 2015,” according to an amicus curiae brief filed by the U.S. Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Civil Rights division in support of those who filed suit against Ohio’s law. 

The DOJ has urged the 6th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals to reverse a lower court’s ruling in favor of the state, writing that Ohio’s voter purge violates the National Voter Registration Act of 1993 and the Help America Vote Act of 2002.

Since 2012, at least 144,000 voters have been removed from Ohio’s voter rolls in its three biggest counties, Reuters reported. The secretary of state’s office said 2 million registered voters had been taken off the rolls in the past five years, though many had been removed because they were deceased.

Husted contends that he is just enforcing the law. “Ohio manages its voter rolls in direct compliance of both federal and state laws, and is consistent with an agreement in this same federal court just four years ago,” Husted said in an April statement after the ACLU of Ohio and Demos, a voting rights organization, filed a lawsuit in the matter.

In predominantly Black neighborhoods near downtown Cincinnati, “more than 10 percent of registered voters have been removed due to inactivity since 2012,” reported Reuters. The outlet found that several places where more voters had cast ballots for President Obama in 2012 were the same locations experiencing higher percentages of purged voters.

“Some of the data is showing that African Americans voters and Democratic voters were much more likely affected,” Clyde said when discussing the state’s purge of registered voters. 

Clyde has requested data on those purged from the rolls, but has been turned down twice. “They’ve said no in two different ways and are referring me to the boards of elections, but there are 88 boards of election,” she told RewireWith limited staff resources to devote to data collection, Clyde is still searching for a way to get answers.

In the meantime, many otherwise eligible voters may have their votes thrown away and never know it.

“[P]eople that had been purged often don’t know that they’ve been purged, so they may show up to vote and find their name isn’t on the roll,” Clyde said. “Then, typically that voter is given a provisional ballot and … told that the board of elections will figure out the problem with their voter registration. And then they don’t really receive notice that that provisional ballot doesn’t eventually count.” 

Though the state’s voter purges could continue to disenfranchise voters across the state, it is hardly the only effort that may impact voting rights there.

“There have been a number of efforts undertaken by the GOP in Ohio to make voting more difficult,” Clyde said. “That includes fighting to shorten the number of early voting days available, that includes fighting to throw out people’s votes that have been cast—whether it be a provisional ballot or absentee ballot—and that includes purging more voters than any other state.” 

This could make a big difference for voters in the state, which has seen a surge of anti-choice legislation under the state’s Republican leadership—including failed Republican presidential candidate Gov. John Kasich.

“So aside from the terrible effect that has on the fundamental right to vote in Ohio, progressives who maybe are infrequent voters or are seeing what’s happening around [reproductive rights and health] issues and want to express that through their vote may experience problems in Ohio because of these aggressive attacks on voting rights,” Clyde said. 

“From our presidential candidates on down to our candidates for the state legislature, there is a lot at stake when it comes to reproductive health care and reproductive rights in this election,” Clyde added. “So I think that, if that is an issue that is important to any Ohioan, they need to have their voice heard in this election.” 

Culture & Conversation Family

‘Abortion and Parenting Needs Can Coexist’: A Q&A With Parker Dockray

Carole Joffe

"Why should someone have to go to one place for abortion care or funding, and to another place—one that is often anti-abortion—to get diapers and parenting resources? Why can’t they find that support all in one place?"

In May 2015, the longstanding and well-regarded pregnancy support talkline Backline launched a new venture. The Oakland-based organization opened All-Options Pregnancy Resource Center, a Bloomington, Indiana, drop-in center that offers adoption information, abortion referrals, and parenting support. Its mission: to break down silos and show that it is possible to support all options and all families under one roof—even in red-state Indiana, where Republican vice presidential candidate Gov. Mike Pence signed one of the country’s most restrictive anti-abortion laws.

To be sure, All-Options is hardly the first organization to point out the overlap between women terminating pregnancies and those continuing them. For years, the reproductive justice movement has insisted that the defense of abortion must be linked to a larger human rights framework that assures that all women have the right to have children and supportive conditions in which to parent them. More than 20 years ago, Rachel Atkins, then the director of the Vermont Women’s Center, famously described for a New York Times reporter the women in the center’s waiting room: “The country really suffers from thinking that there are two different kinds of women—women who have abortions and women who have babies. They’re the same women at different times.”

While this concept of linking the needs of all pregnant women—not just those seeking an abortion—is not new, there are actually remarkably few agencies that have put this insight into practice. So, more than a year after All-Options’ opening, Rewire checked in with Backline Executive Director Parker Dockray about the All-Options philosophy, the center’s local impact, and what others might consider if they are interested in creating similar programs.

Appreciate our work?

Vote now! And help Rewire earn a bigger grant from CREDO:

VOTE NOW

Rewire: What led you and Shelly Dodson (All-Options’ on-site director and an Indiana native) to create this organization?

PD: In both politics and practice, abortion is so often isolated and separated from other reproductive experiences. It’s incredibly hard to find organizations that provide parenting or pregnancy loss support, for example, and are also comfortable and competent in supporting people around abortion.

On the flip side, many abortion or family planning organizations don’t provide much support for women who want to continue a pregnancy or parents who are struggling to make ends meet. And yet we know that 60 percent of women having an abortion already have at least one child; in our daily lives, these issues are fundamentally connected. So why should someone have to go to one place for abortion care or funding, and to another place—one that is often anti-abortion—to get diapers and parenting resources? Why can’t they find that support all in one place? That’s what All-Options is about.

We see the All-Options model as a game-changer not only for clients, but also for volunteers and community supporters. All-Options allows us to transcend the stale pro-choice/pro-life debate and invites people to be curious and compassionate about how abortion and parenting needs can coexist .… Our hope is that All-Options can be a catalyst for reproductive justice and help to build a movement that truly supports people in all their options and experiences.

Rewire: What has been the experience of your first year of operations?

PD: We’ve been blown away with the response from clients, volunteers, donors, and partner organizations …. In the past year, we’ve seen close to 600 people for 2,400 total visits. Most people initially come to All-Options—and keep coming back—for diapers and other parenting support. But we’ve also provided hundreds of free pregnancy tests, thousands of condoms, and more than $20,000 in abortion funding.

Our Hoosier Abortion Fund is the only community-based, statewide fund in Indiana and the first to join the National Network of Abortion Funds. So far, we’ve been able to support 60 people in accessing abortion care in Indiana or neighboring states by contributing to their medical care or transportation expenses.

Rewire: Explain some more about the centrality of diaper giveaways in your program.

PD: Diaper need is one of the most prevalent yet invisible forms of poverty. Even though we knew that in theory, seeing so many families who are struggling to provide adequate diapers for their children has been heartbreaking. Many people are surprised to learn that federal programs like [the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children or WIC] and food stamps can’t be used to pay for diapers. And most places that distribute diapers, including crisis pregnancy centers (CPCs), only give out five to ten diapers per week.

All-Options follows the recommendation of the National Diaper Bank Network in giving families a full pack of diapers each week. We’ve given out more than 4,000 packs (150,000 diapers) this year—and we still have 80 families on our waiting list! Trying to address this overwhelming need in a sustainable way is one of our biggest challenges.

Rewire: What kind of reception has All-Options had in the community? Have there been negative encounters with anti-choice groups?

PD: Diapers and abortion funding are the two pillars of our work. But diapers have been a critical entry point for us. We’ve gotten support and donations from local restaurants, elected officials, and sororities at Indiana University. We’ve been covered in the local press. Even the local CPC refers people to us for diapers! So it’s been an important way to build trust and visibility in the community because we are meeting a concrete need for local families.

While All-Options hasn’t necessarily become allies with places that are actively anti-abortion, we do get lots of referrals from places I might describe as “abortion-agnostic”—food banks, domestic violence agencies, or homeless shelters that do not have a position on abortion per se, but they want their clients to get nonjudgmental support for all their options and needs.

As we gain visibility and expand to new places, we know we may see more opposition. A few of our clients have expressed disapproval about our support of abortion, but more often they are surprised and curious. It’s just so unusual to find a place that offers you free diapers, baby clothes, condoms, and abortion referrals.

Rewire: What advice would you give to others who are interested in opening such an “all-options” venture in a conservative state?

PD: We are in a planning process right now to figure out how to best replicate and expand the centers starting in 2017. We know we want to open another center or two (or three), but a big part of our plan will be providing a toolkit and other resources to help people use the all-options approach.

The best advice we have is to start where you are. Who else is already doing this work locally, and how can you work together? If you are an abortion fund or clinic, how can you also support the parenting needs of the women you serve? Is there a diaper bank in your area that you could refer to or partner with? Could you give out new baby packages for people who are continuing a pregnancy or have a WIC eligibility worker on-site once a month? If you are involved with a childbirth or parenting organization, can you build a relationship with your local abortion fund?

How can you make it known that you are a safe space to discuss all options and experiences? How can you and your organization show up in your community for diaper need and abortion coverage and a living wage?

Help people connect the dots. That’s how we start to change the conversation and create support.

This interview has been edited for length and clarity.

CORRECTION: This article has been updated to clarify the spelling of Shelly Dodson’s name.

credo_rewire_vote_3

Vote for Rewire and Help Us Earn Money

Rewire is in the running for a CREDO Mobile grant. More votes for Rewire means more CREDO grant money to support our work. Please take a few seconds to help us out!

VOTE!

Thank you for supporting our work!