Roundup: Vitter “Abortion is Not a Women’s Issue”

Robin Marty

The Senator from Louisiana makes it clear why anti-choice legislators have no issue with taking away women's rights.

Nevada Senate candidate can say some really stupid things.  But she’s not the only politician to put her foot in her mouth.  Sen. David Vitter (R-LA) is giving her a run for her money by saying that his aide, who has recently made headlines for being charged with domestic violence, wasn’t in charge of “women’s issues.”

Just handling abortion.

Talking Points Memo reports:

It’s all starting to make sense. In continuing to deny that he assigned his former aide, Brent Furer to be his point man on women’s issues after Furer was charged with domestic violence, Sen. David Vitter (R-LA) now says it’s all a big misunderstanding. Furer’s job, it turns out, had nothing to do with women at all.

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If, like Vitter, you don’t count abortion as a woman’s issue, that is.

After his uncomfortable candidate filing event yesterday in Baton Rouge, Vitter faced the press again — this time in Alexandria, where reporters again asked him why Furer’s portfolio included women’s issues. According to Vitter, “he handled issues including abortion issues, including several other issues, but not women’s affairs.”

As Salon points out, it all makes perfect sense when you remember that conservatives believe that abortion isn’t about the woman who is pregnant, but about that potential life inside of her.

Oh, I get it. Perhaps the anti-choice candidate, who has a 100 percent rating from the National Right to Life Committee, doesn’t see abortion as a “women’s issue” so much as a “pre-born fetuses’ issue” or some other such nonsense. That doesn’t explain why Furer was publicly listed the way he was, or why he was charged with working with anti-domestic violence organizations. Regardless, it is plenty revealing, and utterly fitting, that Vitter not only doesn’t see abortion as being particularly relevant to women, but that he saw fit to assign that particular political territory to a man who pled guilty to violently assaulting his girlfriend.

I suppose it’s not very shocking when you think about it.  After all, mostly male legislators have spent huge amounts of time even just this last session in deciding how to restrict women’s access to abortion, especially in Louisiana.  Why would it ever be considered a woman’s issue when so many men are making the final decision?

Video of the exchange follows:

Mini Roundup: As if teen mothers didn’t already have enough to worry about, it looks like they are much more susceptible to birthing premature infants, according to recent studies.

July 8, 2010

La. Gov. Jindal Signs Several Antiabortion Bills – Medical News Today

Poll: Pro-Abortion Barbara Boxer Has Narrow Lead Over Pro-Life Carly Fiorina – LifeNews.com

More Senators Oppose Pro-Abortion Supreme Court Nominee Elena Kaga – LifeNews.com

Sharron Angle’s Advice For Rape Victims Considering Abortion: Turn Lemons Into … – Huffington Post

Sharron Angle: Turn Rape Into Rape-ade – Firedoglake

ACLU Claims Catholic Hospitals Refusing Life-Saving Abortions for Women – LifeNews.com

Michigan Pro-Abortion Groups Back Virg Bernero, Pro-Life Group Supports Cox – LifeNews.com

Good health care includes abortion – Isthmus

Vitter: Furer Handled Abortion, Just Not ‘Women’s Affairs’ (VIDEO) – TPMDC

Angle on abortion, incest, lemons, and lemonade – msnbc.com

David Vitter: Abortion isn’t a “women’s issue” – Salon

Pinay worker in Perth settles suit vs McDonalds over ‘forced abortion’ – GMA news.tv

Ginsburg: Roe will hold – Politico

Males Should Be Actively Involved In Family Planning – Peace FM Online

Should We Need a Prescription for Birth Control Pills? – Babble

What are the most effective contraceptives of today? – Helium

Ethiopia: Speaking Truth on Behalf of Women – AllAfrica.com

Hormonal Contraceptives Have Mixed Success Among Overweight Women – Health Behavior News Service

Teenagers ‘risk premature babies’ – BBC News

Breaking: Middle-aged women like sex – Salon

Study Suggests Link Between HPV, Skin Cancer – MSN Health & Fitness

July 9, 2010

Urges “no” vote on Measure 2 – Mat-Su Valley Frontiersman

Spain’s unrestricted abortion law takes effect – Las Vegas Sun

Delay sought in ruling on dispensing Plan B – Seattle Times

Scientists Discover Most Powerful HIV Antibody Yet – Tonic

UN lauds Namibia’s lifting of travel ban for people living with HIV/AIDS – UN News Centre

Midwives vs. Doctors in US Maternal Mortality Crisis – Inter Press Service

Teenage mothers ‘more likely to give birth prematurely’ – Telegraph.co.uk

Would you tweet during childbirth? – KGO-TV

Mini Roundup:

News Abortion

Study: United States a ‘Stark Outlier’ in Countries With Legal Abortion, Thanks to Hyde Amendment

Nicole Knight Shine

The study's lead author said the United States' public-funding restriction makes it a "stark outlier among countries where abortion is legal—especially among high-income nations."

The vast majority of countries pay for abortion care, making the United States a global outlier and putting it on par with the former Soviet republic of Kyrgyzstan and a handful of Balkan States, a new study in the journal Contraception finds.

A team of researchers conducted two rounds of surveys between 2011 and 2014 in 80 countries where abortion care is legal. They found that 59 countries, or 74 percent of those surveyed, either fully or partially cover terminations using public funding. The United States was one of only ten countries that limits federal funding for abortion care to exceptional cases, such as rape, incest, or life endangerment.

Among the 40 “high-income” countries included in the survey, 31 provided full or partial funding for abortion care—something the United States does not do.

Dr. Daniel Grossman, lead author and director of Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH) at the University of California (UC) San Francisco, said in a statement announcing the findings that this country’s public-funding restriction makes it a “stark outlier among countries where abortion is legal—especially among high-income nations.”

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The researchers call on policymakers to make affordable health care a priority.

The federal Hyde Amendment (first passed in 1976 and reauthorized every year thereafter) bans the use of federal dollars for abortion care, except for cases of rape, incest, or life endangerment. Seventeen states, as the researchers note, bridge this gap by spending state money on terminations for low-income residents. Of the 14.1 million women enrolled in Medicaid, fewer than half, or 6.7 million, live in states that cover abortion services with state funds.

This funding gap delays abortion care for some people with limited means, who need time to raise money for the procedure, researchers note.

As Jamila Taylor and Yamani Hernandez wrote last year for Rewire, “We have heard first-person accounts of low-income women selling their belongings, going hungry for weeks as they save up their grocery money, or risking eviction by using their rent money to pay for an abortion, because of the Hyde Amendment.”

Public insurance coverage of abortion remains controversial in the United States despite “evidence that cost may create a barrier to access,” the authors observe.

“Women in the US, including those with low incomes, should have access to the highest quality of care, including the full range of reproductive health services,” Grossman said in the statement. “This research indicates there is a global consensus that abortion care should be covered like other health care.”

Earlier research indicated that U.S. women attempting to self-induce abortion cited high cost as a reason.

The team of ANSIRH researchers and Ibis Reproductive Health uncovered a bit of good news, finding that some countries are loosening abortion laws and paying for the procedures.

“Uruguay, as well as Mexico City,” as co-author Kate Grindlay from Ibis Reproductive Health noted in a press release, “legalized abortion in the first trimester in the past decade, and in both cases the service is available free of charge in public hospitals or covered by national insurance.”

Commentary Politics

No, Republicans, Porn Is Still Not a Public Health Crisis

Martha Kempner

The news of the last few weeks has been full of public health crises—gun violence, Zika virus, and the rise of syphilis, to name a few—and yet, on Monday, Republicans focused on the perceived dangers of pornography.

The news of the last few weeks has been full of public health crises—gun violence, the Zika virus, and the rise of syphilis, to name a few—and yet, on Monday, Republicans focused on the perceived dangers of pornography. Without much debate, a subcommittee of Republican delegates agreed to add to a draft of the party’s 2016 platform an amendment declaring pornography is endangering our children and destroying lives. As Rewire argued when Utah passed a resolution with similar language, pornography is neither dangerous nor a public health crisis.

According to CNN, the amendment to the platform reads:

The internet must not become a safe haven for predators. Pornography, with its harmful effects, especially on children, has become a public health crisis that is destroying the life [sic] of millions. We encourage states to continue to fight this public menace and pledge our commitment to children’s safety and well-being. We applaud the social networking sites that bar sex offenders from participation. We urge energetic prosecution of child pornography which [is] closely linked to human trafficking.

Mary Frances Forrester, a delegate from North Carolina, told Yahoo News in an interview that she had worked with conservative Christian group Concerned Women for America (CWA) on the amendment’s language. On its website, CWA explains that its mission is “to protect and promote Biblical values among all citizens—first through prayer, then education, and finally by influencing our society—thereby reversing the decline in moral values in our nation.”

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The amendment does not elaborate on the ways in which this internet monster is supposedly harmful to children. Forrester, however, told Yahoo News that she worries that pornography is addictive: “It’s such an insidious epidemic and there are no rules for our children. It seems … [young people] do not have the discernment and so they become addicted before they have the maturity to understand the consequences.”

“Biological” porn addiction was one of the 18 “points of fact” that were included in a Utah Senate resolution that was ultimately signed by Gov. Gary Herbert (R) in April. As Rewire explained when the resolution first passed out of committee in February, none of these “facts” are supported by scientific research.

The myth of porn addiction typically suggests that young people who view pornography and enjoy it will be hard-wired to need more and more pornography, in much the same way that a drug addict needs their next fix. The myth goes on to allege that porn addicts will not just need more porn but will need more explicit or violent porn in order to get off. This will prevent them from having healthy sexual relationships in real life, and might even lead them to become sexually violent as well.

This is a scary story, for sure, but it is not supported by research. Yes, porn does activate the same pleasure centers in the brain that are activated by, for example, cocaine or heroin. But as Nicole Prause, a researcher at the University of California, Los Angeles, told Rewire back in February, so does looking at pictures of “chocolate, cheese, or puppies playing.” Prause went on to explain: “Sex film viewing does not lead to loss of control, erectile dysfunction, enhanced cue (sex image) reactivity, or withdrawal.” Without these symptoms, she said, we can assume “sex films are not addicting.”

Though the GOP’s draft platform amendment is far less explicit about why porn is harmful than Utah’s resolution, the Republicans on the subcommittee clearly want to evoke fears of child pornography, sexual predators, and trafficking. It is as though they want us to believe that pornography on the internet is the exclusive domain of those wishing to molest or exploit our children.

Child pornography is certainly an issue, as are sexual predators and human trafficking. But conflating all those problems and treating all porn as if it worsens them across the board does nothing to solve them, and diverts attention from actual potential solutions.

David Ley, a clinical psychologist, told Rewire in a recent email that the majority of porn on the internet depicts adults. Equating all internet porn with child pornography and molestation is dangerous, Ley wrote, not just because it vilifies a perfectly healthy sexual behavior but because it takes focus away from the real dangers to children: “The modern dialogue about child porn is just a version of the stranger danger stories of men in trenchcoats in alleys—it tells kids to fear the unknown, the stranger, when in fact, 90 percent of sexual abuse of children occurs at hands of people known to the victim—relatives, wrestling coaches, teachers, pastors, and priests.” He added: “By blaming porn, they put the problem external, when in fact, it is something internal which we need to address.”

The Republican platform amendment, by using words like “public health crisis,” “public menace” “predators” and “destroying the life,” seems designed to make us afraid, but it does nothing to actually make us safer.

If Republicans were truly interested in making us safer and healthier, they could focus on real public health crises like the rise of STIs; the imminent threat of antibiotic-resistant gonorrhea; the looming risk of the Zika virus; and, of course, the ever-present hazards of gun violence. But the GOP does not seem interested in solving real problems—it spearheaded the prohibition against research into gun violence that continues today, it has cut funding for the public health infrastructure to prevent and treat STIs, and it is working to cut Title X contraception funding despite the emergence of Zika, which can be sexually transmitted and causes birth defects that can only be prevented by preventing pregnancy.

This amendment is not about public health; it is about imposing conservative values on our sexual behavior, relationships, and gender expression. This is evident in other elements of the draft platform, which uphold that marriage is between a man and a women; ask the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn its ruling affirming the right to same-sex marriage; declare dangerous the Obama administration’s rule that schools allow transgender students to use the bathroom and locker room of their gender identity; and support conversion therapy, a highly criticized practice that attempts to change a person’s sexual orientation and has been deemed ineffective and harmful by the American Psychological Association.

Americans like porn. Happy, well-adjusted adults like porn. Republicans like porn. In 2015, there were 21.2 billion visits to the popular website PornHub. The site’s analytics suggest that visitors around the world spent a total of 4,392,486,580 hours watching the site’s adult entertainment. Remember, this is only one way that web users access internet porn—so it doesn’t capture all of the visits or hours spent on what may have trumped baseball as America’s favorite pastime.

As Rewire covered in February, porn is not a perfect art form for many reasons; it is not, however, an epidemic. And Concerned Women for America, Mary Frances Forrester, and the Republican subcommittee may not like how often Americans turn on their laptops and stick their hands down their pants, but that doesn’t make it a public health crisis.

Party platforms are often eclipsed by the rest of what happens at the convention, which will take place next week. Given the spectacle that a convention headlined by presumptive nominee (and seasoned reality television star) Donald Trump is bound to be, this amendment may not be discussed after next week. But that doesn’t mean that it is unimportant or will not have an effect on Republican lawmakers. Attempts to codify strict sexual mores are a dangerous part of our history—Anthony Comstock’s crusade against pornography ultimately extended to laws that made contraception illegal—that we cannot afford to repeat.