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Are They For Real?

Ellen Brilliant

It's a move characterized by the Washington Post as a "potentially explosive issue among religious conservatives."  Just hours ago, the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices made a recommendation without dissent that young girls receive a newly approved cervical cancer vaccine as a preventive measure.

Seems like a no-brainer, but anti-birth control, anti-abortion, and anti-sex crusaders doth protest. 

It's a move characterized by the Washington Post as a "potentially explosive issue among religious conservatives."  Just hours ago, the CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices made a recommendation without dissent that young girls receive a newly approved cervical cancer vaccine as a preventive measure.

Seems like a no-brainer, but anti-birth control, anti-abortion, and anti-sex crusaders doth protest. 

Why?  Because the vaccine works by preventing HPV, the sexually transmitted disease that often is the cause of most cervical cancer cases.  Their argument is that "vaccinating youngsters against the sexually transmitted virus might make them more likely to have sex."

What?!

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Apparently, the idea of preventing cancer among these youngsters seems to be lost on this crowd.  And sadly, once again, they prefer their ideology over scientific fact. 

As Julie Kay writes for the LA Times, "Focus on the Family believes that abstinence ‘is better protection than any vaccine because it's God's plan for people before they are married.'"

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